Protesters shout at lawmakers walking out of the Capitol on Thursday after the House of Representatives narrowly passed a Republican effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Rob Quist, the Democrat who's running for an open U.S. House race in Montana, campaigns at the University of Montana on April 27, 2017. Quist is a political newcomer who's a well-known country singer in the state. Josh Burnham/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Josh Burnham/Montana Public Radio

A Singing Cowboy, A Millionaire And Rifles Dominate Montana Special Election

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House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., finds himself the center of attention after playing something of a dual role — Trump supporter and independent investigator. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump suffered a major defeat when the GOP health care legislation failed to be brought for a vote in the House on Friday. What transpired endangers all of Trump's agenda moving forward. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Obama signs the Affordable Care Act on March 23, 2010. Since then, the bill has been a battering ram for Republicans. But they're struggling to replace it under President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Speaker Paul Ryan told the media Thursday night that the House would be "proceeding" with the Republican health care bill on Friday, after a meeting with lawmakers. Thursday's vote had been delayed. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump attends a meeting on health care at the White House last week. The bill is facing opposition from all sides. Without its passage, everything else on Trump's agenda could be slowed. Michael Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/Getty Images
Alyson Hurt/NPR

Redistricting Reform Advocates Say The Real 'Rigged System' Is Gerrymandering

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President Donald Trump looks over towards Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, left, after signing his "Comprehensive Plan for Reorganizing the Executive Branch" executive order. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

House Democrats lost seats in the 2016 elections. They're looking to narrow their 24-seat deficit in 2018, when the president's party typically loses seats in his first midterm elections. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

President Trump with Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell (left) and House Speaker Paul Ryan (right) at the White House. All three will have to sell the new health care plan to skeptical factions. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Rep. Frank Pallone still hasn't been given a chance to see the Republicans' bill that would replace the ACA. "I think they're afraid," the Democrat from New Jersey said of his Republican colleagues. "I think they're afraid that it will show that it really doesn't cover most of the people that receive coverage under the Affordable Care Act." Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images

Astrid Silva delivered a Democratic response in Spanish to President Trump's first speech to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In Spanish-Language Response, Activist Says Trump Is Inspiring Discrimination

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Newly elected DNC Chair Thomas Perez — shown here in June 2016 as the secretary of the Labor Department under President Obama — says Democrats need a "50-state strategy" to defeat Republicans at all levels of government. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovich/Getty Images

With Republicans In Charge, Democrats Plan To Redefine Their Mission

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