Dr. Bernard Rosenfeld, 74, has not been able to find a successor to lead his abortion practice in Houston. He says younger doctors don't want to deal with the politics and protesters. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Politics Makes Abortion Training In Texas Difficult

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Luis Alberto de la Rosa says he sells lots of misoprostol, a drug used in abortions and in ulcer treatment, to women from Texas who come to his Miramar Pharmacy in Nuevo Progreso, Mexico. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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Legal Medical Abortions Are Up In Texas, But So Are DIY Pills From Mexico

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Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin walks on the floor of the Oklahoma House on Wednesday. On Friday, Fallin vetoed legislation that would make it a felony for doctors to perform an abortion. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Diane Horvath-Cosper says part of her job is advocating for patients' access to health care, including abortions. Gabriella Demczuk hide caption

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Can A Hospital Tell A Doctor To Stop Talking About Abortion?

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Countries in Latin America have a range of laws regarding abortion, from completely prohibited to no restrictions. Above: Women in Brazil (at left) demonstrate for abortion rights; a woman at a march in Paraguay (at right) holds a poster reading "If Abortion is Not Wrong, Then Nothing Is Wrong." Christophe Simon and Norberto Duarte/Getty Images hide caption

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Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during a press conference March 31, 2015, at the Indiana State Library in Indianapolis. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Bottles of the abortion-inducing drug RU-486, which is used to medically induce abortions in a two-step process. Women take mifepristone (left), and days later, they take misoprostol. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Photo posters line a wall in an ultrasound exam room at a Planned Parenthood location in Boston in 2013. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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In Political Fight Over Abortion, Individual Stories Can Be Lost

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Susan Cahill, owner of All Families Healthcare, stands in front of the first building in Kalispell, Mont., where she offered abortion services. After vandalism closed her last clinic down, Missoula became the nearest place for women in the Flathead Valley to find abortion services. Corin Cates-Carney/MTPR hide caption

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The examining rooms in the Fort Worth clinic do not meet the emergency-room-like standards of the Texas abortion law known as HB 2. It would cost more than $1 million to upgrade this facility, and the clinic's operators say it would be forced to close. Barry Gordemer/NPR hide caption

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Supreme Court Tests Texas' New Restrictions On Abortion

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An American flag flies at half-staff in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington to honor the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Scalia's Death May Mean Texas Abortion Case Won't Set U.S. Precedent

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The American flag, seen through the columns of the Supreme Court building, blows in the wind on Feb. 13. Jon Elswick/AP hide caption

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On The Docket, In Limbo: Scalia's Death Casts Uncertainty On Key Cases

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In the 1960s, posters gave advice to the public on the risk of a pregnant mother transmitting rubella to the fetus. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hide caption

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Robin Wright's fictional character Claire Underwood in the Netflix series House of Cards is a favorite of TV critics and fans. But the demographics of real U.S. women who have abortions are very different from the TV character's. Nathaniel E. Bell/AP hide caption

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Facing Harassment, Some Abortion Providers Turn To Armed Guards, Bullet-Proof Vests

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