House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, shown here at a hearing in March, claims many of the provisions in Dodd-Frank have hurt the economy. Jacquelyn Martin/wld hide caption

toggle caption Jacquelyn Martin/wld

Sen. Bernie Sanders has emphasized shadow banking less than Hillary Clinton, but he maintains that his overall platform is much tougher on Wall Street than hers. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Win McNamee/Getty Images

Risky Shadow Banks Become Campaign Fodder For Democrats

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467822640/467914451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Neel Kashkari, head of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, says some U.S. banks are still too big. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Bloomberg via Getty Images

He Led The Financial Bailout But Says Banks Are Still Too Big To Fail

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467112859/467176637" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bernie Sanders told supporters after winning the New Hampshire primary, "The American people bailed out Wall Street; now it's Wall Street's time to help the middle class." J. David Ake/AP hide caption

toggle caption J. David Ake/AP

How Bernie Sanders' Wall Street Tax Would Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466465333/466512369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trader Michael Capolino (right) watches prices on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Wednesday. Stocks endured another bloodbath, and oil fell below $27 a barrel. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

toggle caption Richard Drew/AP

Wall Street Has Another Brutal Day, As Stock Prices Plummet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463727304/463759267" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley take the stage after individually answering questions during Friday night's First In The South Democratic Presidential Forum at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

toggle caption Chuck Burton/AP

Jack Bogle wants Americans to make more money in the stock market and give less away to financial firms. Courtesy of Vanguard hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Vanguard

The George Washington Of Investing Wants You For The Revolution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/443192311/450464665" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More than half of working people in this country have saved less than $25,000 for retirement and many pay crippling investment fees that eat away at gains. Automated financial advisers called roboadvisers offer a low-fee alternative. Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

Would You Let A Robot Manage Your Retirement Savings?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/445337189/450175859" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript