16-year-old Amaiya Zafar (left) spars in the Circle of Disclipline gym in Minneapolis earlier this month. USA Boxing has granted Zafar a religious exemption to fight in one bout while wearing hijab. Sarah O'Keefe-Zafar hide caption

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Sarah O'Keefe-Zafar

Aiden Kelly trains for the men's singles luge at the 2014 Winter Olympics on Feb. 7, 2014, in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

Wanted: Next Generation Of Luge Competitors

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Jamaica's (left to right) Asafa Powell, Nesta Carter, Usain Bolt and Michael Frater celebrate their gold medal after the men's 4x100-meter relay final in Beijing in 2008. With Wednesday's announcement, the team will have to return those medals. Shaun Botterill/Getty Images hide caption

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The "Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA" network, set to launch next year, will focus on U.S. athletes and show live competitions on the path to the Olympics. Here, U.S. athletes pose during the closing ceremony of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics in August. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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IAAF President Sebastian Coe, left, speaks with FIFA President Gianni Infantino at the opening of an Olympic Summit in Lausanne, Switzerland, Saturday. Olympic sports leaders are discussing how to improve a global anti-doping system amid the fallout of a Russian state-backed cheating scandal. Fabrice Coffrini/AP hide caption

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Jamaica's Usain Bolt crosses the finish line to win the gold in the men's 200-meter final during the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing. Anja Niedringhaus/AP hide caption

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Anja Niedringhaus/AP

Kristin Armstrong won Olympic gold in the cycling time trial the day before she turned 43. Tim de Waele/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim de Waele/Corbis via Getty Images

Olympic Athletes Prove That Older Doesn't Have To Mean Slower

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Anita Alvarez and Mariya Koroleva compete in the women's duets synchronized swimming technical routine preliminary on Monday in Rio de Janeiro. Koroleva has suffered several concussions over the years. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Bello/Getty Images

When Swimmers Get Out Of Sync, The Result Can Be A Kick In The Head

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Michelle Kasold of the U.S. leaves the pitch as Germany's players celebrate their win in a women's quarterfinal field hockey match at the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics. Manan Vatsyayana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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At the 1936 Olympics, 18 black athletes went to Berlin as part of the U.S. team. Pictured here are (left to right, rear) high jumpers Dave Albritton and Cornelius Johnson; hurdler Tidye Pickett; sprinter Ralph Metcalfe; boxer Jim Clark; sprinter Mack Robinson. In front: weightlifter John Terry (left); long jumper John Brooks. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Black U.S. Olympians Won In Nazi Germany Only To Be Overlooked At Home

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