Palestinian travelers wait to cross into Egypt at the Rafah crossing terminal in the southern Gaza Strip earlier this month. Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A view of a tunnel reportedly dug by Palestinians beneath the border between the Gaza Strip and Israel and recently uncovered by Israeli troops, on Sunday. David Buimovitch /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An image taken from an amateur video shows an Israeli soldier dancing atop a Palestinian man's shoulders to the song "Gangnam Style." The soldier and his colleagues have been suspended. YouTube hide caption

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Palestinian Bashir Tamimi, 57, drinks water from a spring on land that he says belongs to his family. Teenagers from a nearby Israeli settlement built collection pools and brought in picnic tables when they saw no one using the spring. It has now become a source of conflict. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Yusra Hammed, 15, puts the finishing touches on a drawing on a wall inside her family's home in Silwad, a village in the West Bank. Hammed says, like many Palestinian girls, she does not throw rocks at Israeli soldiers; but she expresses her opposition through alternate channels, such as art. Emiliy Harris/NPR hide caption

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Red Cross vehicles outside Israel's Ofer prison, between Jerusalem and Ramallah. David Vaaknin/Getty Images hide caption

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Internet giant Google has recognized the Palestinians' upgraded U.N. status, placing the name "Palestine" on its search engine instead of "Palestinian Territories." Ahmad Gharabli /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmed Fahad sells ice cream from a Styrofoam cooler through tangled traffic at the Qalandia checkpoint between Jerusalem and the West Bank city of Ramallah. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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The Two-Way

At Israeli Checkpoint, Tear Gas And Ice Cream A Way Of Life

At the Qalandia checkpoint between Jerusalem and Ramallah, violent flare-ups can be as routine as vendors selling ice cream and CDs.

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With President Clinton presiding, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (left) and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat signed an interim peace accord at the White House in 1993. Twenty years later, President Obama is heading to the region with peace efforts in the deep freeze. Ron Edmonds /AP hide caption

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Emad Burnat, a Palestinian who co-directed the Oscar-nominated documentary 5 Broken Cameras, displays the cameras destroyed by Israeli settlers and security forces. Kino Lorbor Inc./AP hide caption

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