Supporters of Iraqi cleric Muqtada al-Sadr chant slogans after breaking into Baghdad's fortified Green Zone on Friday. Ahmad al-Rubaye /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Navy air wing captains pause on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt last September. Every day, the steam-powered catapult aboard this massive ship flings American fighter jets into the sky, on missions to target the extremist Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Kurdish Regional Government Peshmergas attend a military training exercise conducted by U.S.-led coalition trainers at the Bnaslawa military training camp in Irbil, Iraq, in March. Yunus Keles/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Moyaad Saad, a 43-year-old former civil servant from Baghdad, feeds his 6-month-old daughter Zahara on their cot in a giant tent at a makeshift migrant camp near the border between Greece and Macedonia. Thousands of asylum seekers are now stuck here after several European countries closed their borders to them. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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As Europe Closes Door To Refugees, Tough Choices For 2 Fathers
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Family members and friends carry the Turkish flag-draped coffin of Murat Gul, 20, a security agent killed in Sunday's explosion, during his funeral procession in Ankara, Turkey. Burhan Ozbilici/AP hide caption

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Iraqi soldiers sit in a truck during a training exercise southeast of Baghdad on Jan. 24. The Iraqi military has made progress against the Islamic State, but the extremist group still holds key cities, and numerous other armed factions operate throughout the country. Karim Kadim/AP hide caption

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Iraqi families displaced from the areas of Hawija and Hamrin in northern Iraq traveled to Kirkuk governorate in search of safety on Aug. 31. Thousands continue to flee ISIS-held areas. Marwan Ibrahim/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As Noose Tightens Around ISIS In Iraq, Civilians Flee Hunger And Cold
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A Shiite militia fighter stands in front of a damaged building in Tikrit, Iraq, in April, just days after Islamic State fighters were driven out. Many of the city's Sunni residents have now returned, but the armed Shiite groups remain. For now, the Sunnis and Shiites are mostly getting along. MOHAMMED SAWAF/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Fragile Peace Of An Iraqi City Once Run By ISIS
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Iraqis shop in a Baghdad market back in September. The country is facing severe econoimc problems as the government wages war against ISIS at a time of falling oil revenue. Millions of Iraqis have been driven from their homes, and the country faces huge rebuilding costs in cities damaged by previous fighting. Karim Kadim/AP hide caption

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Iraq Faces A Perfect Economic Storm
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Civilians are loaded in a truck to be taken to safe places Thursday as Iraqi security forces clear the Soufiya neighborhood of Islamic State fighters in central Ramadi, 70 miles west of Baghdad, Iraq. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Iraqi security forces and allied Sunni tribal fighters evacuate an injured woman after she was shot by the Islamic State in Ramadi on Jan. 4. Iraqi forces have pushed ISIS out of much of Ramadi, but daily fighting is still taking place in the southeast part of the city, where ISIS is using civilians as human shields, according to the Iraqi military. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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In Shattered Ramadi, A Weakened ISIS Fights On Behind Human Shields
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A member of Iraq's elite counterterrorism service flashes the "V" for victory sign Tuesday in Ramadi, the capital of Iraq's Anbar province. Iraq's prime minister says the extremist group will be pushed out of Iraq in 2016. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After Ramadi, A Look At What's Next In The Fight Against ISIS
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Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi (center) attends a funeral for two generals killed in fighting with Islamic State militants in Ramadi, west of Baghdad, in August. In an interview Monday with NPR, the Iraqi leader called on the U.S. to provide more airstrikes but said his country does not want ground forces from the U.S. or any other country. AP hide caption

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Iraqi Leader: We Want More U.S. Airstrikes, But Not U.S. Ground Troops
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