climate change climate change

A coffee farmer picks fresh coffee cherries in Colombia. New climate research suggests Latin America faces major declines in coffee-growing regions, as well as bees, which help coffee to grow. Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont hide caption

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Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont

A pile of debris sits outside a business damaged by floodwaters in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on Sept. 5 in Spring, Texas. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Sam Clovis, a conservative talk radio host who ran President Trump's campaign in Iowa, has been nominated to a top scientific post at the Department of Agriculture even though he lacks a science background. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Trump's Nominee To Be USDA's Chief Scientist Is Not A Scientist

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In the upper reaches of the northern state of Uttarakhand, small villages are rain- and snow-fed. As snowfall has declined, farmers are starting to plant crops in winter, when fields would usually lie fallow. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

As India's Climate Changes, Farmers In The North Experiment With New Crops

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The wind direction from the fire in western Greenland has largely blown smoke toward the island's ice sheet and away from communities. Pierre Markuse/Flicker hide caption

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Pierre Markuse/Flicker

Greenland Is Still Burning, But The Smoke May Be The Real Problem

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Drivers maneuver through floodwater after a torrential rain in Alexandria, Egypt. Ibrahim Ramadan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Ibrahim Ramadan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

In Egypt, A Rising Sea — And Growing Worries About Climate Change's Effects

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While the nutritional value of jellyfish chips hasn't yet been measured, chef Klavs Styrbæk says they pair particularly well with fresh veggies, which could earn them a healthy reputation. Courtesy of Kristoff Styrbæk hide caption

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Courtesy of Kristoff Styrbæk

Participants look at a world map showing climate anomalies during the World Climate Change Conference 2015 in France. A draft government report on climate, which was released by The New York Times ahead of publication, says the U.S. is already experiencing the consequences of global warming. Stephane Mahe/Reuters hide caption

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Stephane Mahe/Reuters

Children walk through a rice field outside the town of Kelilalina in eastern Madagascar. Rice is the dominant food and the dominant crop on the Indian Ocean island, but changing weather patterns are disrupting production in some parts of the country. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Erratic Weather Threatens Livelihood Of Rice Farmers In Madagascar

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This June 13, 2014 file photo shows construction on a new nuclear reactor at Plant Vogtle power plant in Waynesboro, Ga. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

How The Dream Of America's 'Nuclear Renaissance' Fizzled

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Former Vice President Al Gore shared a Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for his work on climate change. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Al Gore Warns That Trump Is A 'Distraction' From The Issue Of Climate Change

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Indian female farmers sow paddy in a field during monsoon season near Allahabad on July 19, 2014. The monsoon rains, which usually hit India from June to September, are crucial for farmers whose crops feed hundreds of millions of people. Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images

A new Florida state law allows parents, and any residents, to challenge the use of textbooks and instructional materials they find objectionable via an independent hearing. Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images hide caption

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Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images

New Florida Law Lets Residents Challenge School Textbooks

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A view of the newly-erected wind turbine on Tilos, Greece, part of a microgrid that, along with a solar park and a renewable battery system, will power the island. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Why Greece Has Been Slow To Embrace Clean Energy

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LA Johnson/NPR

The Ongoing Battle Between Science Teachers And Fake News

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Hurricanes in 2012 and 2003 submerged parking lots and park benches, and flooded businesses along Annapolis' Dock Street. City planners estimate that, given the rise in sea level, by 2100 the flood from a once-in-a-hundred-year storm would be almost twice as high as it would be if such a storm hit today. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

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