Allie Wist's "Flooded" dinner spread includes burdock and dandelion root hummus with sunchoke chips; jellyfish salad; roasted hen of the woods mushroom; fried potatoes with chipotle vegan mayo; salted anchovies; and oysters with slippers. Most of these are foods that might be more resilient to climate change and, therefore, what we could be eating in the future, Wist says. Heami Lee/Courtesy of Allie Wist, food stylist C.C. Buckley, prop stylist Rebecca Bartoshesy hide caption

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Heami Lee/Courtesy of Allie Wist, food stylist C.C. Buckley, prop stylist Rebecca Bartoshesy

NET Power has built carbon capture technology into its power plant outside Houston, which will generate electricity by burning natural gas. The demonstration project should be fully operational later this year, according to NET Power. Courtesy of NET Power hide caption

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Courtesy of NET Power

Natural Gas Plant Makes A Play For Coal's Market, Using 'Clean' Technology

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A tart cherry orchard in Michigan. Warmer days in early spring and erratic spring weather have hurt yields in recent years. Still, cherry growers are reluctant to discuss the role of climate change. Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio hide caption

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Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio

Michigan's Tart Cherry Orchards Struggle To Cope With Erratic Spring Weather

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Urban Camouflage for Reptiles: "I basically thought about how turtles have camouflage that doesn't really work very well for them in the urban environments they often live in these days," Keats said. "So my thought was, can we go to our military and look at urban warfare as inspiration." Jonathon Keats hide caption

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Jonathon Keats

Artist's Exhibit Borrows Human Tech To Solve Nature's Manmade Problems

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At Kemper, Mississippi Power has built an entirely new coal plant from the ground up. But the plant, which uses carbon capture technology, has experienced missed deadlines, cost overruns and other problems. Courtesy of Mississippi Power hide caption

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Courtesy of Mississippi Power

Climate-Friendly Coal Technology Works But Is Proving Difficult To Scale Up

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The levees below the Oroville Dam were damaged by heavy floodwaters this winter and many need repairs. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Where Levees Fail In California, Nature Can Step In To Nurture Rivers

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Spraying sea salt into the atmosphere to increase the reflective cloud cover over oceans is the way some scientists think they might be able to bring down Earth's temperature. At least they'd like to safely test the idea on a small scale. Pixza/Getty Images hide caption

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Pixza/Getty Images

Scientists Who Want To Study Climate Engineering Shun Trump

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NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 monitors how the climate is changing. Trump's budget would eliminate some satellites, including OCO-3, a next-generation carbon-monitoring spacecraft. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Trump's Budget Slashes Climate Change Funding

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Women carry food in gunny bags after visiting an aid distribution center in South Sudan on March 10. Albert Gonzalez Farran /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Albert Gonzalez Farran /AFP/Getty Images

Why The Famine In South Sudan Keeps Getting Worse

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A U.S. Coast Guard crew retrieves a canister dropped by parachute in the Arctic in 2011. Over the past four decades, researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and several other universities have studied shifts in atmospheric circulation above the Arctic. NASA/Kathryn Hansen hide caption

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NASA/Kathryn Hansen

Scott Pruitt's comments on carbon dioxide come just over two weeks after he took the helm of the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency with the authority to regulate CO2 and other greenhouse gases as pollutants. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Steve Reed uses OhmConnect, a service that pays customers to lower their energy use at home during periods of high demand. Megan Wood/inewsource hide caption

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Megan Wood/inewsource

Energy Savings Can Be Fun, But No Need To Turn Off All The Lights

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Vegetables were rationed at supermarkets in the U.K. due to poor weather conditions in Europe. Here, lettuce, broccoli and zucchini were rationed at a Tesco store in London. Victoria Jones/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Victoria Jones/PA Images via Getty Images

A refinery in Anacortes, Wash. In 2016, voters in Washington state rejected an initiative that would have taxed carbon emissions from fossil fuels such as coal and gasoline. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Almost 200,000 people were ordered to evacuate after a hole in the emergency spillway in Northern California's Oroville Dam threatened to flood the surrounding area. Climate change could be a factor of extreme flooding in California. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

With Climate Change, California Is Likely To See More Extreme Flooding

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From field to bakery, a loaf of bread packs a measurable environmental punch. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

What's The Environmental Footprint Of A Loaf Of Bread? Now We Know

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Some environmental justice advocates say California's cap-and-trade program hasn't done anything to clean up the air in low-income communities like Wilmington, where refineries are located near residential neighborhoods. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Environmental Groups Say California's Climate Program Has Not Helped Them

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Scientists rallied for evidence-based public policy outside the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco in December. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons

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