California State Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Agoura Hills, holds a bill signed by Gov. Jerry Brown, setting a new goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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The spiny lizard, like other lizards, relies on sunshine and shade to regulate its body temperature. That makes the animals particularly vulnerable to climate change. Michael Angilletta, Arizona State University, Michael Sears, Clemson University hide caption

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A kayaker paddles along Zephyr Cove, near the site of the 20th Annual Lake Tahoe Summit in south Lake Tahoe, Nev. President Obama said the environmental challenges of conservation and fighting climate change are inseparably linked. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Officials found the toxin microcystin in the blue-green algae present at Discovery Bay, Calif. For people exposed to the toxin, symptoms include dizziness, rashes, fever, vomiting and in more unusual cases, numbness. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Poisonous Algae Blooms Threaten People, Ecosystems Across U.S.

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The Crystal Serenity, pictured here in Seward, Alaska, is the largest cruise ship to traverse the Northwest Passage, traveling from Alaska to New York City. Rachel Waldholz/Alaska Public Radio hide caption

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In Warmer Climate, A Luxury Cruise Sets Sail Through Northwest Passage

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Tropical Storm Colin brought big waves to Fort Myers Beach in Fort Myers, Fla., in early June. Given the threat of serious flooding, Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in the area. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Climate Change Complicates Predictions Of Damage From Big Surf

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Sea ice melts off the beach of Barrow, Alaska, where Operation IceBridge is based for its summer 2016 campaign. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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As July's Record Heat Builds Through August, Arctic Ice Keeps Melting

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An abandoned house at the west end of Shishmaref, Alaska, sits on the beach after sliding off during a fall storm in 2005. Diana Haecker/AP hide caption

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Threatened By Rising Seas, Alaska Village Decides To Relocate

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Travis and Sadiye Rieder play with Sinem in their home. They've agreed that if they want more children, they'll adopt. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Should We Be Having Kids In The Age Of Climate Change?

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Joshua Tree National Park is known for its iconic trees, but Joshua tree habitat is expected to shrink dramatically because of climate change. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Planning For The Future Of A Park Where The Trees Have One Name

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Light shines on the mountains behind the Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska. Guides are using the glacier's rapid retreat as a stark lesson on the effects of climate change. Becky Bohrer/AP hide caption

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Visitors To A Shrinking Alaskan Glacier Get A Lesson On Climate Change

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Walrus, shown here on a drying rack, represents a major source of nutritious food for many in Alaska's St. Lawrence Island. In recent years, warmer temperatures have pushed the sea ice farther from St. Lawrence's shores, making walrus hunting more challenging. This shortfall has led to increased food insecurity on the island. Courtesy of Cara Durr hide caption

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Michael Peterson, an archaeologist at Redwood National Park in California, photographs the coastline annually to monitor erosion of archaeological sites. Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix hide caption

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As Storms Erode California's Cliffs, Buried Village Could Get Washed Away

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In 2016, Mesa Verde National Park officials closed Spruce Tree House because of crumbling rock. Previous restoration efforts and more extreme temperature swings, which may be connected to climate change, are two reasons why the staff here thinks rock is crumbling. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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To Preserve History, A National Park Preps For Climate Change

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