A boat approaches Ghoramara island in India's Sundarbans. Most traffic goes the other way, as thousands of Ghoramara residents have left the flood-prone island in recent years. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The Vanishing Islands Of India's Sundarbans
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Villagers throw containers into a well to collect their daily supply of potable water after a tanker made its daily delivery in Shahapur, India, on May 13. India is in the midst of a drought. INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Warming World Means Less Water, With Economic Consequences
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Debnath Mondal (front right), who survived a tiger attack in 2010, patrols the banks of the Sundarbans tiger preserve with another forest guard and a boat skipper. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Debendra Tarek, 80, inspects a handful of salt-resistant rice in his home on the tidal island of Ghoramara, which is shrinking quickly because of climate change. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The mayor of Coral Gables, Fla., worries that the continued rise in sea levels could sink the property values of waterfront neighborhoods. PictureWendy/Flickr hide caption

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Rising Sea Levels Made This Republican Mayor A Climate Change Believer
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A rally, march and mass civil disobedience to stop oil trains in the Port of Albany was held on Saturday by more than 1,500 people from Albany, N.Y., and from as far as Maine, Quebec and central Pennsylvania. Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Gita Prakash (left), who runs a family clinic from her home in New Delhi, examines 10-year-old Sonu Kumar Chaudhary as his father, restaurant deliveryman Dilip Kumar Chaudhary, looks on. Prakash sees more and more cases of illness caused by the city's polluted air. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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India's Big Battle: Development Vs. Pollution
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Louis Fernandez walks along a flooded Collins Avenue in Miami Beach in September 2015. The city is tackling sea-level rise by rebuilding roads and installing new storm sewers and pumps. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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As Waters Rise, Miami Beach Builds Higher Streets And Political Willpower
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President Obama met with China's president, Xi Jinping, at an event linked to the international climate conference held late last year outside Paris. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Can The U.S. And China Keep Their Climate Pledges?
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People in Boston enjoyed a late winter heat wave this past March. In much of the U.S., climate change is causing winters to warm faster than summers. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Climate Change? Some People May Not Be Sweating It Because The Weather Is Nicer
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Rachelle Ianelli (left) and Austin Jacobs (middle) both archaeological students from University of Florida, together with Florida Public Archaeology Network representative Rachael Kangas, excavate a section at "Garden Patch," a settlement populated after rising seas forced people to leave Bird Island. Neill Wallis/University of Florida hide caption

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What Can We Learn From Early Floridians On Sea-Level Rise?
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Jeff Hebert, who is leading New Orleans' efforts to adapt to rising sea levels, stands at the site of the future Mirabeau Water Garden, a federally funded project designed to absorb water in residential Gentilly. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

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Adapting To A More Extreme Climate, Coastal Cities Get Creative
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This undated picture of bleached coral (lower right) on part of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia was taken by Prof. Terry Hughes during an aerial survey of the reef. Terry Hughes/ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies hide caption

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A worker cuts a cluster of grapes in the Burgundy region of France during the harvest period. Global warming has made conditions historically associated with great wines more frequent in Bordeaux and Burgundy, a study finds. But things look less bright for California vineyards. Jeff Pachoud/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walk from the Oval Office to a joint press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House on Thursday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Oregon's large power utilities and environmental advocates have backed new legislation that phases out their use of coal. Here, a coal plant in Boardman, Ore., is seen in a 2014 file photo. Nigel Duara/AP hide caption

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An aerial view of Rostov-on-Don region, where the fertile steppes support some of Russia's best farmland. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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For Russian Farmers, Climate Change Is Nyet So Great
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