German Chancellor Angela Merkel, President Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May hold discussions during the G-7 summit in Taormina, Italy, on Friday. Guido Bergmann/Bundesregierung via Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Bergmann/Bundesregierung via Getty Images

A flag bearing the company logo of Royal Dutch Shell flies outside the energy giant's head office in The Hague, Netherlands, in 2014. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Energy Companies Urge Trump To Remain In Paris Climate Agreement

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The Agriculture Department established research centers in 2014 to translate climate science into real-world ideas to help farmers and ranchers adapt to a hotter climate. But a tone of skepticism about climate change from the Trump administration has some farmers worried that this research they rely on may now be in jeopardy. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Coal is piled up at the Gallatin Fossil Plant in Gallatin, Tenn. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Environmentalists, Coal Companies Rally Around Technology To Clean Up Coal

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Judah (left) and Josh Ridgeway drill a hole in the Tanana River at Nenana, Alaska to measure the thickness of the ice on April 13th. Dan Bross/KUAC hide caption

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Dan Bross/KUAC

Alaska Guessing Game Provides Climate Change Record

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The "talking piece" is held by whoever has the floor at the moment to share their feelings on climate change with the Good Grief group. Judy Fahys/KUER hide caption

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Judy Fahys/KUER

First Step To 'Eco-Grieving' Over Climate Change? Admit There's A Problem

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Native westslope cutthroat trout swim in the north fork of the Flathead River in northwestern Montana. However, cutthroat trout populations are threatened by hybridization from mating with rainbow trout. Jonny Armstrong/USGS hide caption

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Jonny Armstrong/USGS

In The Rockies, Climate Change Spells Trouble For Cutthroat Trout

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Allie Wist's "Flooded" dinner spread includes burdock and dandelion root hummus with sunchoke chips; jellyfish salad; roasted hen of the woods mushroom; fried potatoes with chipotle vegan mayo; salted anchovies; and oysters with slippers. Most of these are foods that might be more resilient to climate change and, therefore, what we could be eating in the future, Wist says. Heami Lee/Courtesy of Allie Wist, food stylist C.C. Buckley, prop stylist Rebecca Bartoshesy hide caption

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Heami Lee/Courtesy of Allie Wist, food stylist C.C. Buckley, prop stylist Rebecca Bartoshesy

NET Power has built carbon capture technology into its power plant outside Houston, which will generate electricity by burning natural gas. The demonstration project should be fully operational later this year, according to NET Power. Courtesy of NET Power hide caption

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Courtesy of NET Power

Natural Gas Plant Makes A Play For Coal's Market, Using 'Clean' Technology

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A tart cherry orchard in Michigan. Warmer days in early spring and erratic spring weather have hurt yields in recent years. Still, cherry growers are reluctant to discuss the role of climate change. Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio hide caption

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Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio

Michigan's Tart Cherry Orchards Struggle To Cope With Erratic Spring Weather

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Urban Camouflage for Reptiles: "I basically thought about how turtles have camouflage that doesn't really work very well for them in the urban environments they often live in these days," Keats said. "So my thought was, can we go to our military and look at urban warfare as inspiration." Jonathon Keats hide caption

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Jonathon Keats

Artist's Exhibit Borrows Human Tech To Solve Nature's Manmade Problems

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At Kemper, Mississippi Power has built an entirely new coal plant from the ground up. But the plant, which uses carbon capture technology, has experienced missed deadlines, cost overruns and other problems. Courtesy of Mississippi Power hide caption

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Courtesy of Mississippi Power

Climate-Friendly Coal Technology Works But Is Proving Difficult To Scale Up

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