U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz takes part in a press conference at the end of the 2015 meeting of the International Energy Agency Governing Board on Nov. 18, 2015 in Paris. ERIC PIERMONT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Says Government Can Help Clean Energy Innovation

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The Hokule'a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world. Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society hide caption

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Hokule'a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars

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A boat approaches Ghoramara island in India's Sundarbans. Most traffic goes the other way, as thousands of Ghoramara residents have left the flood-prone island in recent years. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The Vanishing Islands Of India's Sundarbans

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Villagers throw containers into a well to collect their daily supply of potable water after a tanker made its daily delivery in Shahapur, India, on May 13. India is in the midst of a drought. INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Warming World Means Less Water, With Economic Consequences

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Debnath Mondal (front right), who survived a tiger attack in 2010, patrols the banks of the Sundarbans tiger preserve with another forest guard and a boat skipper. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Debendra Tarek, 80, inspects a handful of salt-resistant rice in his home on the tidal island of Ghoramara, which is shrinking quickly because of climate change. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The mayor of Coral Gables, Fla., worries that the continued rise in sea levels could sink the property values of waterfront neighborhoods. PictureWendy/Flickr hide caption

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Rising Sea Levels Made This Republican Mayor A Climate Change Believer

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A rally, march and mass civil disobedience to stop oil trains in the Port of Albany was held on Saturday by more than 1,500 people from Albany, N.Y., and from as far as Maine, Quebec and central Pennsylvania. Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Gita Prakash (left), who runs a family clinic from her home in New Delhi, examines 10-year-old Sonu Kumar Chaudhary as his father, restaurant deliveryman Dilip Kumar Chaudhary, looks on. Prakash sees more and more cases of illness caused by the city's polluted air. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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India's Big Battle: Development Vs. Pollution

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Louis Fernandez walks along a flooded Collins Avenue in Miami Beach in September 2015. The city is tackling sea-level rise by rebuilding roads and installing new storm sewers and pumps. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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As Waters Rise, Miami Beach Builds Higher Streets And Political Willpower

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