Will the distant future give rise to exhibits of a human past long gone, much as we gawk today at representations of a dinosaur age we can only imagine? Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Villages in the Lower Shire valley of Malawi, like this one named Jasi, rely heavily on subsistence farming and steady rainfall, and are struggling to produce steady harvests. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Malawian Farmers Say Adapt To Climate Change Or Die

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Somali refugees lead their herds of goats home for the night outside Dadaab, Kenya. A new study shows that animals in many parts of the developing world require more food — and generate more greenhouse emissions — than animals in wealthy countries. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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We face real-world decisions now about everything from sea level rise, to energy infrastructure to what food is best for you. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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"Stop this madness," Filipino delegate Yeb Sano says at climate change conference

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A test field of sorghum outside Manhattan, Kan., planted by Kansas State University. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Heat, Drought Draw Farmers Back To Sorghum, The 'Camel Of Crops'

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The Larsen B ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula, which is among the places where such ice has been breaking off. Mariano Caravaca /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Richard Harris discussed the latest report on climate change

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A police officer guards Cambodia's famed temple of Angkor Wat. The powerful city-state collapsed in 1431 after suffering through two decades of droughts. Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

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Two Iberian lynxes at a nature reserve in northern Spain. (February 2006 file photo.) Victor Fraile /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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World War Z is just the latest pop-culture incarnation of the Zombie Apocalypse. Adam Frank says the zombies keep coming because they're trying to tell us something. MPC/Paramount Pictures hide caption

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The Capitol dome is seen behind the Capitol Power Plant, which provides power to buildings in the Capitol complex in Washington, D.C. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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