climate change climate change

The redder the shading, the further above average were the temperatures in September. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center hide caption

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NOAA's National Climatic Data Center

A farmer sifts through the drought-stricken topsoil of his Logan, Kansas, land in August 2012. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Former South Carolina Republican Rep. Bob Inglis now runs the Energy and Enterprise Initiative. /Energy and Enterprise Initiative hide caption

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/Energy and Enterprise Initiative

New Groups Make A Conservative Argument On Climate Change

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Pinot noir grapes are notoriously finicky about the weather, and climate change has winemakers in Oregon thinking about the future. Greg Wahl-Stephens/AP hide caption

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Greg Wahl-Stephens/AP

Somali girls line up to receive a hot meal in Mogadishu last year after the worst drought in the Horn of Africa in decades, compounded by war, put millions in danger of starvation. Roberto Schmmidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmmidt/AFP/Getty Images

A research program in New Zealand is meticulously measuring emissions from farm animals, one source of global warming gasses. Neil Sands/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Neil Sands/AFP/Getty Images

Waves pound a sea wall in Pacifica, Calif., during a storm in 2010. Small assumptions can make a big difference when putting a price-tag on future disasters. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Episode 388: Putting A Price Tag On Your Descendants

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