The Larsen B ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula, which is among the places where such ice has been breaking off. Mariano Caravaca /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Richard Harris discussed the latest report on climate change
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A police officer guards Cambodia's famed temple of Angkor Wat. The powerful city-state collapsed in 1431 after suffering through two decades of droughts. Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

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Two Iberian lynxes at a nature reserve in northern Spain. (February 2006 file photo.) Victor Fraile /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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World War Z is just the latest pop-culture incarnation of the Zombie Apocalypse. Adam Frank says the zombies keep coming because they're trying to tell us something. MPC/Paramount Pictures hide caption

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The Capitol dome is seen behind the Capitol Power Plant, which provides power to buildings in the Capitol complex in Washington, D.C. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Crew members unload a catch of sockeye salmon at Craig, Alaska, in 2005. Researchers say fish are being found in new areas because of changing ocean temperatures. Melissa Farlow/National Geographic/Getty Images hide caption

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Go Fish (Somewhere Else): Warming Oceans Are Altering Catches
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Heron Island is located on the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef, about 25 miles off the northeast coast of Australia. Ted Mead/Getty Images hide caption

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Wild bees, such as this Andrena bee visiting highbush blueberry flowers, play a key role in boosting crop yields. Left photo by Rufus Isaac/AAAS; Right photo courtesy of Daniel M.N. Turner hide caption

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Wild Bees Are Good For Crops, But Crops Are Bad For Bees
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