Arctic sea ice is seen from a NASA research aircraft on March 30, 2017, above Greenland. A top Interior Department scientist who tracks Arctic conditions says he was demoted by the Trump administration for speaking out on climate change. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Climate Scientist Says He Was Demoted For Speaking Out On Climate Change

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The U.S. Gulf Coast at night. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Want To Slow Global Warming? Researchers Look To Family Planning

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Fernando Rojas has spent his life living by a large lake in central Chile. About seven years ago it began to shrink, and now most of the water is gone. He holds a photo taken when the lake was full. Philip Reeves/NPR hide caption

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Philip Reeves/NPR

In Chile, Many Regard Climate Change As The Greatest External Threat

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The massive crack first opened up in the Larsen C ice shelf back in 2014; by the end of last week, a roughly 3-mile sliver of ice was all that connected the iceberg to the shelf. John Sonntag/NASA hide caption

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John Sonntag/NASA

Massive Iceberg Breaks Free In Antarctica

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Hurricane Katrina victims wait at the Convention Center in New Orleans, in September 2005. A report from Scientific American says such natural disasters may increase the gap between rich and poor in affected communities. Eric Gray/AP hide caption

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Eric Gray/AP

Wild horses graze at the Doñana National Park, in the Guadalquivir delta, in southern Spain. Last year, UNESCO threatened to put Doñana on its so-called 'Danger List' of World Heritage Sites where wildlife or conservation are at risk. Cristina Quicler/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cristina Quicler/AFP/Getty Images

Drought Threatens Crops, Wildlife Along Spain's Guadalquivir River Delta

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Potential annual damages are shown on the county-level in a scenario in which emissions of greenhouse gasses continue at current rates. Negative damages indicate economic benefits. Hsiang, Kopp, Jina, Rising, et al./Science hide caption

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Hsiang, Kopp, Jina, Rising, et al./Science

Coffee is thought to have originated in Ethiopia. Coffea arabica, or coffee Arabica, the species that produces most of the world's coffee, is indigenous to the country. Courtesy of Alan Schaller hide caption

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Courtesy of Alan Schaller

Wind turbines provide energy in Egypt's Sinai Desert. Helping developing countries harness energy from the wind is one of the Green Climate Fund's goals. Anton Petrus/Getty Images hide caption

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