Michael Peterson, an archaeologist at Redwood National Park in California, photographs the coastline annually to monitor erosion of archaeological sites. Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix hide caption

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As Storms Erode California's Cliffs, Buried Village Could Get Washed Away

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In 2016, Mesa Verde National Park officials closed Spruce Tree House because of crumbling rock. Previous restoration efforts and more extreme temperature swings, which may be connected to climate change, are two reasons why the staff here thinks rock is crumbling. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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To Preserve History, A National Park Preps For Climate Change

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A heat-stressed koala is doused with water in December 2015 during an extreme heat wave in Adelaide, Australia. Last year was the hottest on record, but 2016 is on pace to supplant it at the top of the list. Every month of this year has set heat records. Morne de Klerk/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Report The Planet Was Hotter Than Ever In The First Half Of 2016

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About 70 percent of Earth is covered by clouds at any given moment. Their interaction with climate isn't easy to study, scientists say; these shape-shifters move quickly. NOAA/Flickr hide caption

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Climate Change May Already Be Shifting Clouds Toward The Poles

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U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz takes part in a press conference at the end of the 2015 meeting of the International Energy Agency Governing Board on Nov. 18, 2015 in Paris. ERIC PIERMONT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Says Government Can Help Clean Energy Innovation

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The Hokule'a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world. Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society hide caption

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Hokule'a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars

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A boat approaches Ghoramara island in India's Sundarbans. Most traffic goes the other way, as thousands of Ghoramara residents have left the flood-prone island in recent years. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The Vanishing Islands Of India's Sundarbans

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Villagers throw containers into a well to collect their daily supply of potable water after a tanker made its daily delivery in Shahapur, India, on May 13. India is in the midst of a drought. INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Warming World Means Less Water, With Economic Consequences

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Debnath Mondal (front right), who survived a tiger attack in 2010, patrols the banks of the Sundarbans tiger preserve with another forest guard and a boat skipper. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Debendra Tarek, 80, inspects a handful of salt-resistant rice in his home on the tidal island of Ghoramara, which is shrinking quickly because of climate change. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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