Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said Mosaic Life Care in St. Joseph, Mo., "deserves credit" for forgiving debts of former low-income patients, but he said that result should not have required congressional and press attention. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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The Medical Board of California accused Peter Brabeck's doctor in 2011 of overprescribing him controlled substances. Afterward, Brabeck, who lives near Carmel, Calif., learned the doctor had hired a private investigator and gave him Brabeck's medical records. Ramin Rahimian for ProPublica hide caption

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ProPublica's Charles Ornstein talks about data breaches

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Sen. Grassley Gives Red Cross Deadline To Explain Haiti Spending

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Advocates for patient safety have had to confront the reality that steps taken to improve the quality of health care can also present opportunities for corruption and conflict of interest. Pascal Fossier/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Joe Kiani, addresses the second-annual Patient Safety, Science & Technology Summit in January 2014. Courtesy of the Patient Safety Movement Foundation hide caption

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A federal database, though imperfect, will make it easier for patients to find out about the ties between doctors and industry. John Bolesky/Corbis hide caption

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4 Years Of Lessons Learned About Drugmakers' Payments To Doctors

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A check of Medicare's new database of payments to physicians confirms that at least $6 million in 2012 went to doctors who had been indicted or otherwise sanctioned. iStockphoto hide caption

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Now that Eli Lilly & Co.'s antidepressant Cymbalta and some other blockbusters have gone generic, the company is spending less on promotional activities by doctors. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Drugmakers Slash Spending On Doctors' Sales Talks

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