A still frame taken from a YouTube video shows Marines who were later disciplined for desecrating three dead Taliban members in a 2011 incident in the southern Afghan province of Helmand. YouTube hide caption

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Case Of Marines Desecrating Taliban Bodies Takes A New Twist

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Afghan National Army Commandos attend their graduation ceremony in Kabul in July. Foreign combat troops are set to leave Afghanistan by the end of 2014 after handing over all security responsibilities to Afghan forces. S. Sabawoon/EPA/Landov hide caption

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How NATO Is Trying To Change The Narrative In Afghanistan

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Afghan men stand at a livestock market set up for the upcoming Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, or "feast of sacrifice," in the center of Kabul Monday. In an email, the Taliban is calling on Afghans to reject a new security agreement with the U.S. Anja Niedringhaus/AP hide caption

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Ahead of an expected — and repeatedly delayed — news conference, an Afghan worker leaves the area where Secretary of State John Kerry and Afghan President Hamid Karzai were expected to speak Saturday in Kabul. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Afghan medics at Forward Operating Base Nolay in the southern province of Helmand treat an Afghan police officer shot by militants. Sean Carberry/NPR hide caption

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As Afghan Troops Take The Lead, They Take More Casualties

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Sadiqullah (center), who was shot by Staff Sgt. Robert Bales and was a witness in the trial, stands with some of the Afghan civilians who traveled from Kandahar to the U.S. for Bales' trial. Translator Ahmad Shafi is at left, in the blue shirt. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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From 'Morning Edition'; Translator Ahmad Shafi on how Afghan victims and witnesses reacted to trial of Staff Sgt. Robert Bales

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Afghanistan and Pakistan, countries that have a history of tense relations, played their first soccer match in nearly 40 years when they met Aug. 20 in Kabul. Afghanistan (in red) won 3-0. Omar Sobhani/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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For Pakistan And Afghanistan, Soccer As Reconciliation

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U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Ty Michael Carter near Dahla Dam, Afghanistan in July 2012. Ho/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pain, Loss And Tears Come With Medal Of Honor

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Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, foreground, is seen in a courtroom sketch earlier this week, as prosecutor Lt. Col. Jay Morse, right, speaks to the jury. Bales was sentenced to life in prison without parole Friday. Peter Millett/AP hide caption

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Ghulam Mujtaba Patang speaks at a news conference Monday after being dismissed from his post as Afghanistan's interior minister. He will stay in the post until the country's Supreme Court rules on the legality of his dismissal. Mohammad Ismail/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Zang-e-Khatar, or Danger Bell, makes fun of government officials and other powerful figures in Afghanistan. Cast members are shown performing a skit during a taping of the show. Sultan Faizy/NPR hide caption

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Despite Many Threats, Afghan TV Satire Mocks The Powerful

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Afghan soldiers take positions following a clash with Taliban fighters on the outskirts of the eastern city of Jalalabad on July 7. The U.S. is trying to organize peace talks, but the latest effort has been put on hold while the fighting continues. Noorullah Shirzada/Getty Images hide caption

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Despite Repeated Tries, Afghan Peace Efforts Still Sputter

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Photos depict scenes at the $34 million command center in Camp Leatherneck, completed in November. U.S. troops will never use the facility, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction says. SIGAR hide caption

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'A $34 Million Waste Of The Taxpayers' Money' In Afghanistan

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