An anti-abortion demonstrator outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in March. Last month the high court struck down a Texas law that imposed tight regulations on abortion providers. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she regrets calling Donald Trump a "faker" and making other disparaging remarks about the candidate. Allison Shelley/Getty Images hide caption

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Ginsburg Apologizes For 'Ill-Advised' Trump Comments

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Tracing The 'Rise Of The Judicial Right' To Warren Burger's Supreme Court

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A Planned Parenthood clinic in Florida. The organization filed the lawsuits that led to injuctions in Florida and Indiana. Michele Sandberg/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Abortion-rights activists chant outside the U.S. Supreme Court ahead of a historic ruling Monday striking down a Texas law that imposed strict requirements on clinics that perform abortions. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Abortion rights activists celebrate outside the U.S. Supreme Court Monday for a ruling in a case over a Texas law that places restrictions on abortion clinics. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on a number of cases on Monday, including whether people who have domestic violence convictions should have access to firearms. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Donald Verrilli speaks outside the Supreme Court in Washington after arguments about the death penalty on Jan. 7, 2008. He became solicitor general in 2011. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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The Man Who Argued Health Care For Obama Looks Back As He Steps Down

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Attorney Bert Rein speaks to the media while standing with plaintiff Abigail Noel Fisher after the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in her case in 2012 in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Abigail Fisher, who challenged the use of race in college admissions, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court on Dec. 9, 2015. The Supreme Court upheld the University of Texas' affirmative action program in a 4-3 decision. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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A critic of the New York City Police Department stop-and-frisk policy wears a shirt outlining a citizen's search rights at a City Council meeting in August 2013. The Supreme Court ruled Monday in an unrelated case that even if police stop someone without cause, if a reason is then found to search them, any evidence collected is admissible in court. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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