Judicial nominee John Bush was challenged by senators about his conservative views during a committee hearing but ultimately confirmed by the Senate on Thursday. Bingham Greenebaum Doll LLP hide caption

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Bingham Greenebaum Doll LLP

The Supreme Court left in place a lower court's broadened definition of close family members who could be exempt from the travel ban, including the grandparents and cousins of a person in the U.S. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

In this June 1, 2017 file photo Supreme Court Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch is seen during an official group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Justice Neil Gorsuch Votes 100 Percent Of The Time With Most Conservative Colleague

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Dave Mullins (right) sits with his husband, Charlie Craig, in Denver. The owner of a cake shop refused to make a wedding cake for the couple, citing his religious beliefs, and the couple then filed with the state's civil rights commission. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Muslims and supporters gather on the steps of Borough Hall in Brooklyn, N.Y., during a protest against President Trump's temporary travel ban in February. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

Supreme Court Revives Parts Of Trump's Travel Ban As It Agrees To Hear Case

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The confluence of the St. Croix, top, and Mississippi Rivers, bottom, is seen from the air on May 31, 2012. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Environmentalists Rejoice: Court Says Land Regulation Doesn't Go 'Too Far'

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The Supreme Court says a lower court erred in its guidance to a jury about the standard for stripping a refugee of her American citizenship. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

The Metropolitan Detention Center in the Brooklyn borough of New York, where the plaintiffs were detained for months following the September 11 attacks. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Supreme Court Rules Post-9/11 Detainees Can't Sue Top U.S. Officials

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