Joy Reynolds of San Diego, Calif., looks over Friday's front pages on display at the Newseum in Washington, the day after the Supreme Court ruling on President Barack Obama's health care law. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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Chief Justice John Roberts, shown in 2010, is still "finding his role as chief justice," says one law professor. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters and supporters of President Obama's health care law await the Supreme Court's ruling Thursday. The court ruled to uphold the law. The focus now shifts to the states, which are responsible for the lion's share of getting people without insurance covered. Kevin Dietsch/UPI /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Kevin Dietsch/UPI /Landov

Kailash Sundaran (left), Devyn Greenberg and Devontae Freeland celebrate the Supreme Court's ruling upholding the Affordable Health Care Act outside the court Thursday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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When the U.S. Supreme Court rules Thursday on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, it will also rule on whether the expansion of Medicaid is an unconstitutional infringement of states' rights. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Adam Cole/NPR

Jackson Cahn, who graduated from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Wash., is one of the 3 million young adults the Obama administration says would have risked going without insurance if the health care law hadn't allowed them to stay on their parents' policies. Because of the law, his mother, June Blender, was able to add him to her insurance. Courtesy of June Blender hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of June Blender