Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina cover streets on Aug. 30, 2005, in New Orleans. Vincent Laforet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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New Maps Label Much Of New Orleans Out Of Flood Hazard Area

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A coffin is seen in a flooded cemetery in August in Sorrento, La. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Keeping The Dead In Their Place

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Myra Engrum stands by the huge pile of her and her son's belongings, plus all the wet building materials that have been pulled out of her flooded house. Eve Troeh/Eve Troeh hide caption

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Eve Troeh/Eve Troeh

A Mom's Life, Rebuilt After Katrina, Wrecked By Baton Rouge Floods

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Jeff Hebert, who is leading New Orleans' efforts to adapt to rising sea levels, stands at the site of the future Mirabeau Water Garden, a federally funded project designed to absorb water in residential Gentilly. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

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Adapting To A More Extreme Climate, Coastal Cities Get Creative

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Beyonce's new music video "Formation" is full of social commentary. Via YouTube hide caption

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Via YouTube

Zandria F. Robinson reads from her piece on New South Negress

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Palm trees bend and banners rip on Canal Street as Hurricane Katrina blows through New Orleans on Aug. 29, 2005 — 10 years ago Saturday. Ted Jackson/The Times-Picayune/Landov hide caption

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3 Views On A Tragedy: Reporters Recall First Days After Katrina

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Paul and Lakeya Mazant met in 2007, during Mardi Gras, as New Orleans was reeling from the flooding after Hurricane Katrina. The couple — pictured with their son Paul, 1, and daughter Logan, 5 — say they couldn't imagine falling in love with someone who hadn't experienced the storm. Walter Ray Watson/NPR hide caption

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A Decade After Flood's Devastation, Love Keeps New Orleans Afloat

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Water spills into New Orleans' Lower Ninth Ward through a failed floodwall along the Industrial Canal on Aug. 30, 2005, a day after Hurricane Katrina tore through the city Pool/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Billions Spent On Flood Barriers, But New Orleans Still A 'Fishbowl'

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Ronnie Landry, 14, plays basketball in front of his home on Schnell Drive. He and his father, Wilbert Landry, bottom right, moved here from the 9th Ward of New Orleans in 2014. Noney Deffes, bottom left, is a longtime Schnell Drive resident who survived the flood in a neighbor's attic, then lived out of her recreational vehicle before returning to her home. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

The Survivors' Street: 10 Years Of Life After Katrina

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President George W. Bush (center) surveys the devastation in New Orleans with (from left to right) Vice Adm. Thad Allen, Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco, Mayor Ray Nagin and Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Sept. 12, 2005, two weeks after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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"Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job ..."

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Johnny Jackson looks out the back door of his home as he talks to his neighbors in New Orleans. Jackson's home is still under construction 10 years after Hurricane Katrina nearly destroyed his property. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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At A Shelter Of Last Resort, Decency Prevailed Over Depravity

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University Medical Center New Orleans on Aug. 1, when the $1 billion facility welcomed its first patients. Brett Duke/The Times-Picayune/Landov hide caption

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Katrina Shut Down Charity Hospital But Led To More Primary Care

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Angela Chalk looks at a home in New Orleans' 7th Ward that hasn't been touched since Hurricane Katrina. Chalk, the vice president of the 7th Ward neighborhood association, spends some of her free time tracking down and reporting dilapidated and abandoned properties. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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New Orleans Neighborhoods Scrabble For Hope In Abandoned Ruins

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Mississippi resident Ethel Curry stands in front of her East Biloxi home, which was rebuilt with the help of volunteers after Hurricane Katrina. Evelina Burnett/MPB hide caption

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Scars Of Katrina Slow To Heal For Mississippi Gulf Coast

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New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu speaks about New Orleans' emergence as a model of urban renewal and economic recovery 10 years after Hurricane Katrina during a visit Tuesday to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mayor Landrieu To Displaced New Orleanians: 'Y'all Can Come Home'

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Ian Spencer Cook for StoryCorps

In New Orleans' Hardest-Hit Neighborhood, A Recovery — By Sheer Will

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