Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi, seen here arriving for a party meeting Thursday, is expected to be closely involved in the incoming president's decisions. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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This 11-year-old boy lives with his family in a Roma settlement in Belgrade. "He and his brothers and sisters are without documents, but he had this amazing confidence," Constantine says. Greg Constantine hide caption

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On Wednesday in Yangon, Myanmar, two police officers read about the elections that saw opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi's party win a majority of seats in parliament. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Supporters of Myanmar's National League for Democracy cheer as election results are posted outside party headquarters in Yangon, Myanmar's capital. Aung San Suu Kyi and other opposition leaders have tried to temper the celebrations, in anticipation of having to form a coalition — and contend with the military. Mark Baker/AP hide caption

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Amid Slow Vote Count, Myanmar Opposition 'Cautiously' Eyes Victory
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Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi delivers a speech next to party patron Tin Oo (left) in Yangon, Myanmar, on Monday. Suu Kyi on Monday hinted that her party will win the country's historic elections, and urged supporters not to provoke their losing rivals. Khin Maung Win/AP hide caption

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Supporters of Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi celebrate as they hear the first official results of the elections on a giant screen outside the National League for Democracy headquarters in Yangon on Monday. Nicolas Asfouri /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi says she will be "above the president" if her party wins Sunday's election. In a constitutional clause that appears directed at her, a person can't become president if he or she is married to a foreign national or has children who are foreign nationals. Suu Kyi's late husband was British, as are their two sons. Mark Baker/AP hide caption

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Residents stand at the entrance of Aung Mingalar, a Rohingya quarter of Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar. All but 4,000 of the neighborhood's 15,000 mostly Rohingya residents either fled or were forced to move to internment camps after violence between Buddhists and Muslims in 2012 killed about 200 people. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Barricaded In, Myanmar's Rohingya Struggle To Survive In Ghettos And Camps
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Office of the Attorney General spokesman Wanchai Roujanavong talks to reporters during a news conference in Bangkok, Thailand, on Friday after the announcement that scores had been indicted on charges of human trafficking. Sakchai Lalit/AP hide caption

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Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi speaks at rally in Yangon, Myanmar, last year. Suu Kyi won the Nobel Peace Prize for her struggle for democracy in her homeland, but has faced criticism lately for not speaking out about the plight of the Rohingya, a Muslim minority that has faced discrimination and violence. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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A fishing boat carrying Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants is pulled to shore by Achenese fishermen off the coast of Julok, in Indonesia's Aceh province, on Wednesday. Antara Foto/Syifa/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Desperate Rohingya Granted Temporary Shelter. But What Next?
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Newly arrived Rohingya migrants gather at Kuala Langsa Port in Langsa, Aceh province, Indonesia, on Friday after coming ashore. Most such migrants have been prevented from making port in Southeast Asia. Binsar Bakkara/AP hide caption

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Rohingya refugees sit on a plastic sheet at Matang Raya village, Baktya district in Aceh Utara, Aceh province, Indonesia, on Sunday. Nearly 600 migrants thought to be Rohingya refugees from Myanmar were rescued from two wooden boats stranded off the coast of Indonesia's northern Aceh province, authorities said. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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