Former Exxon Mobil CEO and Chairman Rex Tillerson testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday as nominee to be Donald Trump's secretary of state. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

ExxonMobil Chairman and CEO Rex Tillerson is Donald Trump's pick for secretary of state. Liberals have howled over his nomination and so have some GOP hawks. But should they? Eric Piermont/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Piermont/AFP/Getty Images

ExxonMobil chairman and CEO Rex Tillerson speaks in March 2015 at a discussion organized by the Economic Club of Washington. President-elect Donald Trump is expected to name Tillerson as his nominee for secretary of state today. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Rex Tillerson, chief executive officer of Exxon Mobile Corp., left, listens on the opening day of the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum this past June. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani (from left) gives a tour of the World Trade Center site to U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan and New York Gov. George Pataki a week after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Timothy Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Timothy Clary/AFP/Getty Images

In Dealings With U.N. Diplomats, Mayor Giuliani Pulled No Punches

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502963147/502980068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama and Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., at the White House this afternoon. Mandel Ngan /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan /AFP/Getty Images

President Obama nominates Sen. Kerry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167786760/167810252" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Some Republicans are betting that President Obama won't push for a Susan Rice nomination if it could jeopardize negotiations with the GOP on things like the budget, or immigration. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Nov. 14 TOTN Junkie segment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/165249986/165140576" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">