FBI Director James Comey, shown here testifying on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, has told friends and employees he had few good choices in the investigation into Clinton's handling of classified information on her private email server. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

DOJ Watchdog To Review Pre-Election Conduct Of FBI, Other Justice Officials

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Former President Bill Clinton plays with balloons onstage at the end of the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia in July. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

A Clinton supporter stands alone in the bleachers after Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in New York City emptied. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

During his annual news conference in Moscow, Russian President Vladimir Putin said he agreed with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump that even someone lying on their sofa could have hacked the Democratic National Committee. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Latino voters go to the polls for early voting at the Miami-Dade Government Center on October 21, 2004 in Miami, Florida. A key constituency in Florida, many wondered how conservative Latinos would vote after now President-elect Trump's remarks on immigration. Gaston De Cardenas/Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas/Getty Images

Latinos Will Never Vote For A Republican, And Other Myths About Hispanics From 2016

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Protesters demonstrate in Philadelphia last week. Republican Donald Trump is assured of a victory, unless there is a massive — and totally unexpected — defection by the electors pledged to support him. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

5 Things You Should Know About The Electoral College

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Plenty of Trump opponents are begging electors to vote against Trump. But it's hard to see that effort being very successful. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and John Podesta arrive for a portrait unveiling ceremony for retiring Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., last week. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

U.S. intelligence agencies charge that operatives with ties to Russia and Vladimir Putin's (above) administration hacked private Clinton and Democratic National Committee emails during the presidential election and released them via WikiLeaks. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

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Darko Vojinovic/AP

In a speech on Capitol Hill honoring outgoing Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid on Thursday, Hillary Clinton warned of the dangers of fake news. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., won re-election as House minority leader on Wednesday with support from just over two-thirds of her caucus. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

Oliver Potts, the director of the Office of the Federal Register, oversees the Electoral College. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Brian Naylor/NPR

Trump's Election Calls Attention To Electoral College And Small Federal Agency

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Hillary Clinton leaves after speaking at the Children's Defense Fund Beat the Odds Celebration at the Newseum in Washington on Nov. 16. It was her first speech since losing the presidential election. Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images