People walk past the entrance of the parking garage where reporter Bob Woodward held late night meetings with Deep Throat, his Watergate source who later turned out to be Mark Felt, the FBI's former No. 2 official. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Thousands Of Toys Wash Ashore On German Island

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/509305185/509673166" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ben Bradlee, then-executive editor of The Washington Post, looks at the front page of the newspaper, headlined "Nixon Resigns," in the composing room on Aug. 8, 1974. David R. Legge/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David R. Legge/Washington Post/Getty Images

Ben Bradlee, Who Led 'Washington Post' To New Heights, Dies At 93

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/352758758/357998958" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democratic Rep. Henry Waxman of California fields a flurry of phone calls in his Capitol Hill office just after announcing Thursday that he'll retire after 40 years in the House of Representatives. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A reporter (not Deep Throat) strikes a dramatic pose beside one of the columns inside the Arlington, Va., garage where Bob Woodward met with his secret source during the Watergate days. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Buttons from 4 of the 5 original members of the Class of '74 who still serve in Congress. (Will someone please tell Henry Waxman to make a button?) Ken Rudin collection hide caption

toggle caption
Ken Rudin collection

last week's podcast

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/155063336/155068077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">