Men, African-Americans, Hispanics and less educated young people are particularly likely to live with their parents. But across all demographics, more and more people are living with Mom and Dad, Pew found. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Factories have been closing in southwest Ohio for years. This Delphi factory in Dayton shut down in 2006. Economists say that to a large degree, the decline in middle incomes reflects the loss of factory jobs. J.D. Pooley/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama participates in a roundtable discussion with members of the Muslim community Wednesday while visiting the Islamic Society of Baltimore in Windsor Mill, Md. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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People line up to cross into the U.S. from Mexicali, Mexico in this 2012 photo. A new report finds the flow has tended to go the other way since the recession, with more Mexicans leaving the United States than arriving. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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A woman prays at Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. The shift away from religion among Americans has taken place in a relatively short period of time. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Poll Finds Americans, Especially Millennials, Moving Away From Religion
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Vietnamese-Americans light candles at St. Helena, a Catholic church in Philadelphia, on April 4. Like many other once-struggling churches, St. Helena has been revitalized by immigrant parishioners. About 200 Vietnamese families worship at this church, along with others from Latin America, the Philippines and Africa. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Built By Immigrants, U.S. Catholic Churches Bolstered By Them Once Again
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Andrew Kohut (right) and Bruce Stokes are guests at the Christian Science Monitor breakfast on May 3, 2006 in Washington, D.C. Andy Nelson/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images hide caption

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