Months after a concussion or other traumatic brain injury, you may sleep more hours, but the sleep isn't restorative, a study suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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A Concussion Can Lead To Sleep Problems That Last For Years

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One Silicon Valley startup that encouraged its employees to think about work 24/7 found they missed market signals, tanked deals and became too irritable to build crucial working relationships. Hill Street Studios/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Many Grouchy, Error-Prone Workers Just Need More Sleep

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Half Your Brain Stands Guard When Sleeping In A New Place

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Sleep Deprived: We're Recharging Our Phones, But Not Ourselves

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Sleep Munchies: Why It's Harder To Resist Snacks When We're Tired

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Jeffrey Iliff (left), a brain scientist at Oregon Health & Science University, has been studying toxin removal in the brains of mice. He'll work with Bill Rooney, director of the university's Advanced Imaging Research Center, to enroll people in a similar study in 2016. Courtesy of Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

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Lack Of Deep Sleep May Set The Stage For Alzheimer's

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Rough night? Depending on specific tweaks to their genes, some fruit flies have trouble falling asleep, and others can't stay asleep. Getting too little shut-eye hurts their memory. David M. Phillips/Science Source hide caption

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How Research On Sleepless Fruit Flies Could Help Human Insomniacs

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Gulping down coffee to stay awake at night delays the body's natural surge of the sleep hormone melatonin. Hayato D./Flickr hide caption

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Caffeine At Night Resets Your Inner Clock

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People who don't get enough sleep show higher levels of inflammation, say scientists who study colds. Smoking, chronic stress and lack of exercise can make you more susceptible to the viruses, too. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Corbis hide caption

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Sleep More, Sneeze Less: Increased Slumber Helps Prevent Colds

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Michael Arnott, of Cambridge, Mass., says he used to have trouble staying awake on long drives. Sleep specialists discovered he has obstructive sleep apnea, though not for the most common reasons — he isn't overweight, and doesn't smoke or take sedatives. M. Scott Brauer for NPR hide caption

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Snooze Alert: A Sleep Disorder May Be Harming Your Body And Brain

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