Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (left) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren wave to the crowd before a campaign rally at the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal on Monday. John Sommers II/Getty Images hide caption

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Elizabeth Warren speaks at the Democratic National Convention on Sept. 5, 2012, in Charlotte, N.C. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren: From Professor To Pugilist

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., at the National Press Club Wednesday. Warren was critical of President Obama's plan to change how U.S. multinational companies are taxed. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush had a tough week with his changing positions on the Iraq War and trying to explain whether he would have authorized it, knowing what we know now. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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President Obama talks with Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak at the East Asia Summit in Myanmar in November. Obama is trying to strike a 12-country Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would include Malaysia. Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren talked about 2016 to WBUR's Here & Now: "What I care about is that everyone who runs for president, who runs for any national office right now, talks about this core set of issues." Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, of Massachusetts, speaks to a group of supporters at a rally in support of Kentucky Democratic candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes in June. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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"Who does Washington work for?" asked Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., after her bill that would let people refinance student debt was shot down in June. It was a question she came back to repeatedly in an NPR interview on the Goldman Sachs bailout and federal regulation of the financial sector. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Transcript: Sen. Warren's Full NPR Interview On Financial Regulation

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., at a November hearing of the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee. A recent op-ed critical of Warren's brand of economic populism sparked an intraparty dispute among Democrats. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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