Mohammad Sultan stands outside the locked door of a children's clinic in Gaza City. Sultan ran the clinic for World Vision, which temporarily closed the center after its Gaza director was accused of diverting humanitarian assistance to Hamas. Nicholas Schifrin/NPR hide caption

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Gaza Needs Aid, But Israel Says Some Has Reached Hamas Militants

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The office of the World Vision, in east Jerusalem. A senior staffer in Gaza was arrested in June and indicted on Thursday. Ahmad Gharabli /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Israel Accuses World Vision Employee Of Embezzling Millions For Hamas

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A cart in the garden of the U.S. Consulate in Jerusalem displays produce grown in Gaza: tomatoes, sweet potatoes, eggplant, sweet and hot peppers, green onions and herbs. Like all products leaving Gaza, this shipment needed Israeli approval. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Israeli Yosef Haim Ben-David (center), the ringleader in the killing of Palestinian teenager Mohammed Abu Khdeir in 2014, is escorted by Israeli policemen at the district court in Jerusalem on Tuesday. Ahmad Gharabli /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Israeli soldiers watch as a machine drills holes on the Israeli side of the border with the Gaza Strip, as they search for tunnels reportedly used by Hamas for fighting Israel, on Feb. 10. Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The View Of Gaza, On 24/7 Video

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Ihab al-Aloul (left) and his sons Abdel Rahman, 9, and Ahmed, 22, at the family's pool in Gaza City. The Aloul family left Gaza in 2008 and moved to British Columbia, Canada, but returned to Gaza in the fall of 2014. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Gaza To Canada And Back To Gaza: Why A Family Chose To Return

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Qatari official Mohammed al-Emadi (left) visits Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh in Gaza City on March 12. Israel has accused Qatar of financing Hamas weaponry but still allows Qatar to spends millions in Gaza on aid and development projects. Ashraf Amra/APA/Landov hide caption

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Why Israel Lets Qatar Give Millions To Hamas

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Palestinian girls walk past buildings in Gaza City that were destroyed during the 50-day war between Israel and Hamas militants in the summer of 2014. Dozens of Israeli soldiers have now given testimonials saying that indiscriminate firing was tolerated, or even encouraged at times. Thomas Coex /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Israeli Soldiers: Lax Rules In Gaza War Led To Indiscriminate Fire

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In Gaza, all hermaphroditic goats will go to heaven. On Sunday, authorities ordered the slaughter of this animal — which had male sex organs and udders — lest people mistakenly believe that its milk had special powers. And if another hermaphrodite goat turns up, it too will face the knife. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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The ground floor walls of the Otaish family's home are gone and the rest of the house is also bombed out, but they have decided to live in what's left of it. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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With Few Choices, Gaza Family Makes Bombed-Out Shell Its Home

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The Islamist group Hamas, shown here in a rally in the Gaza Strip on Dec. 12, is the strongest faction in the Gaza Strip. The Islamic State, or ISIS, is not believed to be in the territory, though fliers purporting to be from the group have circulated in Gaza. They are widely believed to be fake, but both Israel and Hamas have tried to use them to their advantage. Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Gaza, The Specter Of ISIS Proves Useful To Both Sides

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