A mobile clinic set up to test students for HIV is parked near Madwaleni High School in Mtubatuba, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa on March 8, 2011. Parts of the South African province have HIV rates that are more than twice the national average. Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Amid An AIDS Epidemic, South Africa Battles Another Foe: Tuberculosis

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At the International AIDS conference, a female condom fashion show raised awareness about the rising need for more female condoms. Olwin Manyanye of Zimbabwe shows off one of the dresses decorated with a second-generation female condom, called "FC2." Benjamin Morris/NPR hide caption

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Longtime AIDS activist Dr. Ashraf Grimwood says South Africa has made huge strides in confronting HIV. But he worries that giving anti-retroviral drugs to healthy people could have negative consequences in the long term. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Anti-AIDS posters at the Eshowe public health clinic in Kwazulu Natal, South Africa. Clinicians there are hoping to slow the spread of HIV by getting more people treatment. Jason Beaubien /NPR hide caption

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French surgeon Pierre Foldes in his Paris office in 2004. Foldes performs reconstructive surgery on women who have undergone genital mutilation. He recently authored a study on the long-term effects of the surgery. Jean Ayissi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tensions are rising between Sudan and its recently independent neighbor, South Sudan. Adriane Ohanesian/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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State Of Emergency Raises The Stakes In Sudan

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A family of elephants in Kenya's Maasai Mara game reserve. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A worker piles sacks of corn at a market in Guatemala City. Daniel LeClair/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Cattle and zebra share a meal in a pasture in Kenya. Ryan Lee Sensenig/Science hide caption

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Zebra And Cattle Make Good Lunch Partners, Researchers Say

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Kwame Nkrumah Masoleum is the final resting place of Ghana's first president, who led the campaign to liberate Ghana from colonial rule on March 6, 1957. neate photos/flickr hide caption

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A demonstrator throws a rock towards police during demonstrations in Tunis. Fred Dufour /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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