Africa Africa

Adama Sankoh, 40 (center), who contracted Ebola after her son died from the disease late last month, stands with health officials the moment after she was discharge from Mateneh Ebola treatment center outskirt of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Alie Turay/AP hide caption

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Alie Turay/AP

The crowded streets of Kolkata, India, are only going to get more crowded. Randy Olson/National Geographic hide caption

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Randy Olson/National Geographic

11 Billion People By 2100 — And India Will Be More Populous Than China

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Babajide Bello of the tech company Andela takes a selfie with AOL's Steve Case after the pair played a pickup game of pingpong. Courtesy of Andela hide caption

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Courtesy of Andela

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

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A man in Nairobi, Kenya, stands in front of a mural of President Obama, created by the Kenyan graffiti artist Bankslave, ahead of Obama's trip to Kenya and Ethiopia. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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Ben Curtis/AP

Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald is one of the Catholic Church's top experts on Islam. He has served the Vatican in places such as Tunisia, Uganda and Egypt, and now is promoting interfaith understanding by teaching Jesuit students in Cleveland about the Quran. /Rob Wetzler hide caption

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/Rob Wetzler

Learning About The Quran ... From A Catholic Archbishop

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Migrants wait to disembark at the Catania harbor in southern Italy on April 24. In recent weeks, hundreds of migrants leaving Libya have drowned trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea to European countries, including Italy, Spain and Greece. Alessandra Tarantino/AP hide caption

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Alessandra Tarantino/AP

Flood Of Desperate Refugees Tests Spaniards' Tolerance

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Chantel, 3, and Antoni, 7 months, migrated to Spain from their native Cameroon, with their mother Tatiana Kanga, 25. Tatiana was nine months pregnant with Antoni when they crossed the Mediterranean Sea together in an inflatable boat. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

9 Months Pregnant, An African Woman Risks It All And Heads To Europe

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The King Jacob, a Portuguese-flagged cargo vessel, was the first ship to arrive near the migrant boat that sank off the Libyan coast over the weekend. The boat had been carrying more than 800 people. Alessandro Fucarini/AP hide caption

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Alessandro Fucarini/AP

Merchant Ships Called On To Aid Migrants In Mediterranean Feel The Strain

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African migrants climb the fence that separates Morocco from the Spanish enclave of Ceuta in North Africa in February. Those who make it into Ceuta have reached Spanish — and European Union — soil. Their fate often depends on the country they came from. Some are deported, while others can apply for political asylum or for the status of economic migrant. Reduan/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Reduan/EPA/Landov

The Fences Where Spain And Africa Meet

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It's a drone delivery! This copter is ferrying medicine from a pharmacy to the headquarters of Deutsche Post in Bonn, Germany, part of a test of drone capabilities. Andreas Rentz/Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

A man hammers a wall with elections posters at an open market in Kano, Nigeria, on Friday. The country is preparing for presidential elections on Saturday. President Goodluck Jonathan faces former military ruler Muhammadu Buhari and 13 other candidates in what is seen as the closest presidential race since the end of military rule in 1999. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Goran Tomasevic/Reuters/Landov

As Nigeria Votes, The Specter Of Boko Haram Hangs Over The Election

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