Jaime Rangel helps Gustavo Ruiz, 12, align a tire on his bike, at a recent community event in southeast Fresno, Calif. As manager for Bici Projects, Rangel promotes cycling in the Latino community as a great way to get in shape. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED

Studies show that kids' household income seems to be a more important predictor of their risk of becoming overweight and obese than their race or ethnicity. Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images

Silvester Fullard fixes dinner for his 11-year-old son Tavestsiar. When Tavestsiar first came to live with his dad in 2010, he was closed off, Silvester says; "he didn't want to be around other kids." Charles Mostoller for NPR hide caption

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Charles Mostoller for NPR

To Head Off Trauma's Legacy, Start Young

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An orange showing signs of "citrus greening" this spring in Fort Pierce, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The 'Greening' Of Florida Citrus Means Less Green In Growers' Pockets

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Dr. Robert Zarr, second from right, leads a hike through a park in Washington, D.C. Diana Bowen/National Park Service hide caption

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Diana Bowen/National Park Service

To Make Children Healthier, A Doctor Prescribes A Trip To The Park

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The CDC would be happy with these guys, who were playing in Birmingham, Ala., in July 2013. Teenage boys say basketball is their favorite activity. Mark Almond/AL.COM /Landov hide caption

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Mark Almond/AL.COM /Landov

Most Teens Aren't Active Enough, And It's Not Always Their Fault

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Playing outside can help kids — and their parents — maintain a healthy weight. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Adult Obesity May Have Origins Way Back In Kindergarten

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