"We must enforce the law consistent with our priorities," said an Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesperson in regard to upcoming plans to detain and deport Central American immigrants, many of whom fled their homes due to rampant gang violence. Russell Contreras/AP hide caption

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Maria Sanchez, a legal U.S. resident, narrowly missed being deported to her native Mexico for a felony she committed in 1998. Richard Gonzales/NPR hide caption

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Immigrant Felons And Deportation: One Grandmother's Case

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Patrons of the the New World Mall in Flushing ride the escalator from the food court. The Queens neighborhood has become a hot spot for northern Chinese immigrants in the past few years. The trend has brought a cultural wave of influence on the food and business markets in the community. Cameron Robert/NPR hide caption

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Leaving China's North, Immigrants Redefine Chinese In New York

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Teela Magar and Cing Neam prepare the roti dough as part of Edible Alphabet, a program in Philadelphia that folds English lessons for new immigrants to the U.S. into a cooking class. Students also learn about seasonality and healthful eating on a budget. Bastiaan Slabbers hide caption

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Immigration Relief Possible In Return For Crime Victims' Cooperation

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A U.S. Coast Guard crew (foreground) with six Cubans who were picked up in the Florida Straits in May. A larger Coast Guard vessel is in the background. The number of Cubans trying to reach the U.S. has soared in the past year. Many Cubans believe it will be more difficult to enter the U.S. as relations improve, though U.S. officials say there will be no rule changes in the near term. Tony Winton/AP hide caption

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Cuban Immigrants Flow Into The U.S., Fearing The Rules Will Change

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A flag reading "Refugees welcome here" greets visitors to London's Immigration Museum, located on Princelet Street in an East End building that housed immigrants from the early 18th century onward. Today the museum, in need of structural repairs, is open only on certain days and by appointment for groups. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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As European Migrants Face British Backlash, A Reminder: They're Not The First

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The photographer brings a surreal touch to the epidemic that struck West Africa in photos titled "Le Temps Ebola." The suits worn by the people portraying health professionals evoke carnival masks and animal masks. The question the photographer ponders: "Are these figures here to protect the people or to harm them?," reflecting mistrust of medical workers in the early stages of the outbreak. Courtesy of Bakary Emmanuel Daou hide caption

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Carlos Alfaro, 19, practices with a soccer ball before a match in New York City. Some members of his youth soccer team are set to meet with Pope Francis in September. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Through Soccer, Teen Migrants Rebuild Lives And Get Chance To Meet Pope

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Former refugee Kuo Nam Lo, the reporter's mother, stands outside an old army barracks that's been converted into the Pennsylvania National Guard Military Museum at Fort Indiantown Gap. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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'Chasing Memories' In Their Refugee Camp 40 Years After Fleeing Vietnam

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Brig. Gen. Viet Luong of the 1st Cavalry Division came to the United States in the 1970s after his family fled Vietnam in the waning days of the war there. He's now leading the effort to train Afghan soldiers to fight the Taliban. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The Frightened Vietnamese Kid Who Became A U.S. Army General

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A year ago, Lina says her parents took her to Yemen because her grandmother was gravely ill. But when the family arrived, Lina's father announced that she would be getting married to a local man. Renee Deschamps/Getty Images/Vetta hide caption

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Thousands Of Young Women In U.S. Forced Into Marriage

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The California Supreme Court righted what it called a "grievous wrong" by posthumously granting a law license to Hong Yen Chang, a Chinese immigrant whose application was denied because of his race 125 years ago. AP/Ah Tye Family hide caption

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A Chinese Immigrant Gets His California Law License, 125 Years Later

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Young fans of the German national soccer team drink iced tea in July 2010 as they watch the FIFA World Cup semi-final match Germany vs. Spain in an Arabic cafe in Berlin's Neukölln district. The neighborhood has gentrified rapidly in recent years, but many of the white families moving in leave once their children reach school age. Local groups are trying to change that. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Berlin, Grassroots Efforts Work To Integrate Inner-City Schools

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A sonar profile view of SS City of Rio de Janeiro above a painting of the steamer. Coda Octopus (top) and painting of SS City of Rio De Janeiro /NOAA (top); Mystic Seaport (bottom) hide caption

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U.S. Border Patrol agent Richard Funke looks for footprints from illegal immigrants crossing the U.S.- Mexico border near Nogales, Ariz., in 2010. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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