Mammograms are a key screening tool for breast cancer. But critics say they're not good enough. Salih Dastan/iStockphoto hide caption

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Salih Dastan/iStockphoto

People practice yoga at a fundraiser for a breast cancer foundation in Hong Kong. Ed Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/Getty Images

A woman is positioned for a traditional mammogram at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. Bizuayehu Tesfaye/AP hide caption

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Bizuayehu Tesfaye/AP

Mammography detects cancer, but debate rages over when and how often women should get screened. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Sally O'Neill decided to have a double mastectomy rather than "do a wait-and-see." Richard Knox/NPR hide caption

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Richard Knox/NPR

When Treating Abnormal Breast Cells, Sometimes Less Is More

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The Susan Komen for the Cure Foundation is pulling back from some high-profile fundraising walks. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy after genetic testing has prompted a discussion about which other tests should be covered. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Regina and Gabriel Brett talk with Michel Martin about their cancer dilemma

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