This illustration shows a device made by MammoSite used to deliver targeted doses of radiation as part of brachytherapy. Courtesy Radiological Society of North America hide caption

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Wider Use Of Breast Cancer Radiation Technique Raises Concern

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As Komen Defends Itself, Planned Parenthood Rakes In Substitute Funds

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Arlene Kalley and her daughter Leila, who support the use of Avastin for breast cancer, hold a banner outside the National Mall in Washington in June.

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From left, Priscilla Howard, Crystal Hanna and Nancy Haunty, all breast cancer patients, listen at a Food and Drug Administration hearing on Avastin in Silver Spring, Md., on Tuesday. Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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New York plastic surgeon Brad Jacobs holds a silicone gel breast implant in 2006. That year the FDA allowed silicone implants back on the market, after a 14- year hiatus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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