TV host Samantha Harris says she will have a double mastectomy after being diagnosed with breast cancer. But the surgery doesn't eliminate cancer risk. Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP hide caption

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Mary-Claire King says obscurity gave her the freedom to spend years looking for breast cancer genes. Mary Levin/University of Washington hide caption

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How Being Ignored Helped A Woman Discover The Breast Cancer Gene

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Mammograms are a key screening tool for breast cancer. But critics say they're not good enough. Salih Dastan/iStockphoto hide caption

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People practice yoga at a fundraiser for a breast cancer foundation in Hong Kong. Ed Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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A woman is positioned for a traditional mammogram at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. Bizuayehu Tesfaye/AP hide caption

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Mammography detects cancer, but debate rages over when and how often women should get screened. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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