The Susan Komen for the Cure Foundation is pulling back from some high-profile fundraising walks. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy after genetic testing has prompted a discussion about which other tests should be covered. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Regina and Gabriel Brett talk with Michel Martin about their cancer dilemma

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Peggy Orenstein talks with David Greene on Morning Edition

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In sharing her decision to have a double mastectomy, Angelina Jolie has given voice to a dilemma more women are facing. Carlo Allegri/AP hide caption

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Actress Angelina Jolie at a news conference with Secretary of State John Kerry (in background) and other foreign ministers in London last month. They held a forum on how to reduce sexual violence against women in conflict zones — an issue she has often spoken about. Alastair Grant /PA Photos /Landov hide caption

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Younger Women Have Rising Rate Of Advanced Breast Cancer, Study Says

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Betty Daniel gets a routine yearly mammogram from mammography tech Stella Palmer at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago in 2012. Heather Charles/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Breast Cancer: What We Learned In 2012

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A mammographer prepares a screen-film mammography test for patient Alicia Maldonado at a hospital in Los Angeles. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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With Routine Mammograms, Some Breast Cancers May Be Overtreated

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Scientists Parse Genes Of Breast Cancer's Four Major Types

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Mammograms may pose a particular risk to women with genetic mutations that predispose them to breast cancer. Bill Branson/National Cancer Institute hide caption

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