New research finds eating soy milk, edamame and tofu does not have harmful effects for women with breast cancer, as some have worried. In fact, for some breast cancer survivors, soy consumption was found to be tied to longer life. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

For Breast Cancer Survivors, Eating Soy Tied To A Longevity Boost

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519030514/519037092" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sixty-three percent of women who used the Paxman cooling device said they used wigs or head wraps to cover up hair loss, compared to 100 percent of women who didn't try cooling. Courtesy of Baylor College of Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Baylor College of Medicine

Cooling Cap May Limit Chemo Hair Loss In Women With Breast Cancer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515164003/515242394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mammograms are good at finding lumps, but it can be hard to determine which could become life-threatening and which are harmless. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Damian Dovarganes/AP

Danish Study Raises More Questions About Mammograms' Message

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/508928906/509001428" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lack of access to quality medical care remains a major factor in higher breast cancer death rates among African-Americans. Deborah Jaffe/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Deborah Jaffe/Getty Images

Following up a mammogram with an ultrasound exam can find more cancers. But the additional test can also find more false positives that aren't cancer at all. F. Astier/Centre Hospitalier Regional/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
F. Astier/Centre Hospitalier Regional/Science Source

Family medical histories are used to figure out whether it is worthwhile for a woman to be tested for BRCA genetic mutations, which increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images

By testing tumors, researchers hoped to identify women who could avoid chemotherapy without increasing their risk of a cancer recurrence. Voisin/Phanie/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Voisin/Phanie/Science Source

Study Of Breast Cancer Treatment Reveals Paradox Of Precision Medicine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/491213713/491242764" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Arnaldo Silva with his daughter Vanessa at StoryCorps. StoryCorps hide caption

toggle caption
StoryCorps

For Dad And Daughter Fighting Breast Cancer, Grit Runs In The Family

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487671579/487884907" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Breasts deemed "dense" in a mammogram tend to have less fatty tissue and more connective tissue, breast ducts and glands, doctors say. About 40 percent of women between the ages of 40 and 74 have dense breasts. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

When Erika Stallings was 22, she found out that she might have a genetic mutation that greatly increased her risk of cancer. Misha Friedman for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Misha Friedman for NPR

More People Seek Genetic Testing, But There Aren't Enough Counselors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473066953/474639433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bad Luck Or Bad Genes? Dealing With BRCA And 'A Cancer In The Family'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470371943/470407152" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript