The American Cancer Society has pushed back the age at which most women should begin having mammograms to 45. iStockphoto hide caption

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Cancer Group Now Says Most Mammograms Can Wait Till 45
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Lateral mammogram showing a tumor iStockphoto hide caption

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Surgeon Seeks To Help Women Navigate Breast Cancer Treatment
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Science-based guidelines say there's no benefit to getting an EKG of heart activity before routine cataract surgery — even if the patient is old. But most doctors order such tests anyway. Bull's Eye/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

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Why Many Doctors Don't Follow 'Best Practices'
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Betty Daniel gets a routine yearly mammogram from mammography tech Stella Palmer at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago in 2012. Heather Charles/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Breast Cancer: What We Learned In 2012
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A mammographer prepares a screen-film mammography test for patient Alicia Maldonado at a hospital in Los Angeles. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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With Routine Mammograms, Some Breast Cancers May Be Overtreated
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Mammograms may pose a particular risk to women with genetic mutations that predispose them to breast cancer. Bill Branson/National Cancer Institute hide caption

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Radiologist Gerald Iba checks mammograms at The Elizabeth Center for Cancer Detection in Los Angeles in May 2010. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Karen Lindsfor, a professor of radiology and chief of breast imaging at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, examines the mammogram of a patient with heterogeneously dense breast tissue. Lindfors is among those doctors who say there was insufficient evidence to support the idea that additional screenings would detect cancers earlier. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Studies Reignite Mammography Debate For Middle-Aged Women
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The problem of breast cancer overdiagnosis with mammograms is similar to the dilemma faced by men diagnosed with prostate cancer because of a PSA test. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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