Breasts deemed "dense" in a mammogram tend to have less fatty tissue and more connective tissue, breast ducts and glands, doctors say. About 40 percent of women between the ages of 40 and 74 have dense breasts. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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In a study of 1.3 million women, ages 40 to 74, having a false positive on a screening mammogram was associated with a slightly increased chance that the woman would eventually develop breast cancer. The extra risk seemed to be independent of the density of her breasts. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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False Alarm Mammograms May Still Signal Higher Breast Cancer Risk

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A woman's health history and tolerance for different kinds of risks should have a legitimate role in determining the timing of when she starts and stops getting screening mammograms, some leading doctors say. Sally Elford/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Is Mammogram Advice Still Such A Tangle? Ask Your Doctor

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The American Cancer Society has pushed back the age at which most women should begin having mammograms to 45. iStockphoto hide caption

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Cancer Group Now Says Most Mammograms Can Wait Till 45

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Lateral mammogram showing a tumor iStockphoto hide caption

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Surgeon Seeks To Help Women Navigate Breast Cancer Treatment

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Science-based guidelines say there's no benefit to getting an EKG of heart activity before routine cataract surgery — even if the patient is old. But most doctors order such tests anyway. Bull's Eye/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

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Why Many Doctors Don't Follow 'Best Practices'

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Betty Daniel gets a routine yearly mammogram from mammography tech Stella Palmer at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago in 2012. Heather Charles/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Breast Cancer: What We Learned In 2012

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A mammographer prepares a screen-film mammography test for patient Alicia Maldonado at a hospital in Los Angeles. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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With Routine Mammograms, Some Breast Cancers May Be Overtreated

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