Refugees walk around Kladesholmen, Sweden, on Feb. 10. Last year, Sweden received more than 160,000 asylum applications, more than any European country proportionate to its population. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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As Sweden Absorbs Refugees, Some Warn The Welcome Won't Last

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Forester Jorgen Andersson clears trees with his horse, not a tractor. He says he'd never thought of taking an Afghan refugee as an apprentice — especially one who'd never been in a forest before. But now, he says, "I'm happy to do that." Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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After Fleeing The Taliban, An Afghan Reinvents Himself In Sweden

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Teacher Mohammad Abdualamir and two students. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

A Swedish Town's Newest Residents Settle In And Make A New Start

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A batch of sourdough starter can live indefinitely, but it also requires a certain amount of care and feeding. In Sweden, bakers jetting off for vacation can leave their precious starters in the care of a sitter at the airport. iStockphoto hide caption

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Asylum seekers from Afghanistan play football Feb. 7 in a resort in Halmstad, Sweden, where they are living temporarily. Sweden took in 163,000 migrants in 2015. Resistance to migrants is beginning to grow among some Swedes. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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As Migrants Flow In, Sweden Begins To Rethink Its Open-Door Policy

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Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck have taken in two Afghan teenagers. Franck, who came to Sweden as a German refugee after World War II, says, "I'm remembering what was happening to me when I was a child." Courtesy of Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck hide caption

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Courtesy of Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck

Fleeing Alone, Some Migrant Kids Find Foster Homes In Sweden

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Kent Norman, a retired Swedish engineer, is helping Syrian teenager Mohamed Obai with language study. "They're here now," he says, "so the only thing you can do is to help them." Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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In A Small Swedish Town, Residents Welcome Migrants

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Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's essay "We Should All Be Feminists" has gone out to high schoolers in Sweden. Adichie also wrote the novels Half of a Yellow Sun and Americanah. JB Reed/AP hide caption

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A picture provided to AFP by a student shows the masked attacker holding a sword as he poses for a photo with two students before beginning a deadly attack at a primary and middle school in Trollhattan, Sweden, Thursday. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Penicillin became a wonder drug for fighting infections in the 1940s. Jean-Claude Fide was an early adapter, injected in 1948 in the French town of Mont-pres-Chambord. Bert Hardy/Picture Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Migrants, mostly from Syria and Iraq, set out on foot along a highway on the Danish-German border, heading north to Sweden on Wednesday. They arrived that morning on a train from Germany. CLAUS FISKER/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Migrants Enter Denmark, Determined To Reach Sweden

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Defenders Meghan Klingenberg, left, and Becky Sauerbrunn of the United States sandwich Sofia Jakobsson of Sweden on Friday during their Group D World Cup match in Winnipeg, Canada. Wang Lili/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Helicopter belonging to the Netherlands participates in NATO's Dynamic Mongoose anti-submarine exercise in the North Sea, off the coast of Norway, on May 4, 2015. MARIT HOMMEDAL/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nina Galata displays her smartphone equipped with a card reader to accept donations and payment for Situation Stockholm, a magazine sold by Stockholm's homeless. Jonas Ekstromer/TT/AFP/Getty hide caption

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Cash Is Definitely Not King For Card-Carrying Swedes

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The tiny town of Sundsvall, Sweden, is home to the world's first airport to land passenger planes by remote control. The cameras used to help the air traffic controllers guide airplanes render details as small as cars pulling into the parking lot from miles away. Rich Preston/NPR hide caption

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In Sweden, Remote-Control Airport Is A Reality

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Surströmming, a fermented herring considered to be a famous delicacy in Sweden, is also known as one of the most pungent foods in the world. Pauline Conradsson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Surströmming Revisited: Eating Sweden's Famously Stinky Fish

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