August A. Busch (center) and his sons, Adolphus III (left) and August Jr., seal the first case of beer off the Anheuser-Busch bottling plant line in St. Louis on April 7, 1933, when the sale of low-alcohol beers and wines was once again legal. Prohibition didn't officially end until Dec. 5 of that year. AP hide caption

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The 'Bitter' Tale Of The Budweiser Family

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A detail of a map from Food: An Atlas that shows sources of food found at farmer's markets in Berkeley, California. Cameron Reed/Food: An Atlas hide caption

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Cameron Reed/Food: An Atlas

Still Life with Fruit and Nuts, by Robert Seldon Duncanson Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington hide caption

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Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington

A Readable Feast: Poems To Feed 'The Hungry Ear'

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Hilary Mantel, winner of the Man Booker Prize for Fiction, poses with her prize shortly after the award ceremony in London Tuesday. Mantel, won the 50,000 British pounds (approximately $80,000) prize with her book Bring up the Bodies. Lefteris Pitarakis/AP hide caption

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Lefteris Pitarakis/AP

A general view of the Radcliffe Camera building, part of the Bodleian Library, in Oxford, England. Along with the Vatican, the library is launching a project to digitally scan rare texts and put them online. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/Getty Images