Arkansas running back Jonathan Williams had just scored a touchdown against Missouri last season when he dropped the ball and raised his hands in a hands up, don't shoot" gesture. L.G. Patterson/AP hide caption

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A Deep-Rooted History Of Activism Stirs In College Football

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People interlock hands on the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in Charleston, S.C., a few days after nine black churchgoers were killed by a white shooter in June. A new PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds attitudes about opportunities in the U.S. for blacks and whites contrast along racial lines. The poll will be discussed during PBS' America After Charleston broadcast Monday night. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Can Health Care Be Cured Of Racial Bias?

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Then NAACP Chairman Julian Bond addresses the civil rights organization's annual convention in Detroit in 2007. Bond, a civil rights activist and longtime board chairman of the NAACP, died Saturday, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. He was 75. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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President Obama spoke with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep at the White House last week. Nick Michael/NPR hide caption

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A Year After Ferguson, Obama Tells NPR He Feels 'Great Urgency'

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Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, (left) poses with his uncle, Philip Lee, and father Peter Lee (seated) at the younger Peter Lee's home in Pasadena, Calif., in 2013. Gina Ferazzi/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Gina Ferazzi/LA Times via Getty Images

Meet The California Family That Has Made Health Policy Its Business

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The Meaning Of A Hero Cast In Shadow, In Harper Lee's 'Go Set A Watchman'

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Sgt. Patrick Swanton of the Waco Police Department speaks to the media as Texas Department of Public Safety Trooper D.L. Wilson (left) stands near a Twin Peaks restaurant where nine members of a motorcycle gang were shot and killed in Waco, Texas, on Tuesday. Mike Stone/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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A helicopter flies over a section of Baltimore affected by riots. Richard Rothstein writes that recent unrest in Baltimore is the legacy of a century of federal, state and local policies designed to "quarantine Baltimore's black population in isolated slums." Patrick Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos

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Officers stand watch at the intersection of West North Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue as protesters walk for Freddie Gray in Baltimore in April. Gray died from spinal injuries about a week after he was arrested and transported in a police van. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Police Rethink Tactics Amid New Technologies And Social Pressure

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This combination made with file photos provided by the Madison, Wis., police department and Wisconsin Department of Corrections shows Madison Police officer Matt Kenny (left) and Tony Robinson, a biracial man who was killed by the officer. Kenny shot the unarmed 19-year-old in an apartment house on March 6. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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Oakland police officers, wearing body cameras, form a line during demonstrations against recent incidents of alleged police brutality nationwide. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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California Bill Could Limit Police Access To Body Camera Footage

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Charlotte Police Chief Rodney Monroe answers questions from the group. Lisa Wolf/WFAE hide caption

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Lisa Wolf/WFAE

In Charlotte, N.C., Police Use Simulators To Engage Community Amid Distrust

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