race relations race relations

President Obama responds to a question from NPR's Steve Inskeep on Dec. 17 in the Oval Office. Mito Habe-Evans/NPR hide caption

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Mito Habe-Evans/NPR

Here's Why Obama Said The U.S. Is 'Less Racially Divided'

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Whiteness Project participants were filmed talking about race. The project doesn't use their names, to encourage frankness. Feral Films, Inc. hide caption

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Feral Films, Inc.

The Whiteness Project: Facing Race In A Changing America

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Even Under Obama, Black Activist Says Every Inch Of Progress Is A Fight

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Former Officer: Policing Takes Patience, But Black Suspects Get Little

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Marc Quarles, his wife, Claudia Paul, and their children, Joshua and Danielle, live in an affluent, predominantly white neighborhood in California. Quarles says his neighbors treat him differently when his children aren't around. Courtesy of Marc Quarles hide caption

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Courtesy of Marc Quarles

Six Words: 'With Kids, I'm Dad. Alone, Thug'

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Dontey Carter (from left), Mel Moffitt, Lenard Smith, Ned Alexander and Allen Frazier are all members of the Lost Voices group, formed after Michael Brown's death in August. They say they want to ensure justice for Michael Brown and other unarmed individuals killed by police officers. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

With Ferguson Protests, 20-Somethings Become First-Time Activists

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Attorney General Eric Holder participates in a closed-door meeting Wednesday with students at St. Louis Community College, Florissant Valley. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Holder Seeks To Soothe Nerves During Visit To Ferguson

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Protesters hold their hands up as an LAPD officer talks on Aug. 14 in the aftermath of the shooting of a 25-year-old African-American man. The department says confidence in the LAPD has helped head off the kind of unrest seen in Ferguson, Mo., over the shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

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Mark J. Terrill/AP

After Shooting, LAPD Uses Friendlier Face To Avoid Ferguson's Woes

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Theodore Wafer (center) and his attorney Mack Carpenter sit in the back of the courtroom Jan. 15 before his arraignment in Detroit in the shooting death of Renisha McBride. Rebecca Cook/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Rebecca Cook/Reuters/Landov

Miami Dolphins offensive linemen Richie Incognito, left, and Jonathan Martin in July. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP