race relations race relations

Charlotte Police Chief Rodney Monroe answers questions from the group. Lisa Wolf/WFAE hide caption

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Lisa Wolf/WFAE

In Charlotte, N.C., Police Use Simulators To Engage Community Amid Distrust

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Rev. Channing E. Phillips, (left) Rabbi Arthur Waskow, and Topper Carew on April 4, 1969, the night of the first Freedom Seder. Courtesy of Arthur Waskow hide caption

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Courtesy of Arthur Waskow

In Freedom Seder, Jews And African-Americans Built A Tradition Together

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Rick Ector trains new gun owners at a range just outside of Detroit. He supports more African-Americans getting permits to carry concealed weapons. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

More African-Americans Support Carrying Legal Guns For Self-Defense

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Larenda Myres holds an iced coffee drink with a "Race Together" sticker on it at a Starbucks store in Seattle. Starbucks baristas will no longer write "Race Together" on customers' cups starting Sunday. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Demonstrators of different races and religions from across the country united to take part in the historic march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., 50 years ago. AP hide caption

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AP

'A Proud Walk': 3 Voices On The March From Selma To Montgomery

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A makeshift memorial is seen on March 11 in Madison, Wis., in remembrance of 19-year-old Tony Robinson, who was fatally shot by a Madison police officer on March 6. Carrie Antlfinger/AP hide caption

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Carrie Antlfinger/AP

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin addresses a crowd of protesters on Martin Luther King Boulevard in Madison, Wis., during a protest of the shooting death of Tony Robinson. Andy Manis/AP hide caption

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Andy Manis/AP

Racial Tension Draws Parallels, But Madison Is No Ferguson

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Yonkers community activist Hector Santiago demonstrates the "stop-and-shake" with Lt. Pat McCormack of the Yonkers Police Department. The idea, Santiago says, is to get people to introduce themselves to cops on the street. Courtesy of Hector Santiago hide caption

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Courtesy of Hector Santiago

Instead Of Stop-And-Frisk, How About Stop-And-Shake?

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Kathy Van Sluyters (left), Barbara Carr and Colleen Dickinson chat on a recently finished sidewalk across from Wildflower Terrace, a mixed-income apartment building in the Mueller development for people ages 55 and over. Julia Robinson for NPR hide caption

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Julia Robinson for NPR

A Texas Community Takes On Racial Tensions Once Hidden Under The Surface

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President Obama responds to a question from NPR's Steve Inskeep on Dec. 17 in the Oval Office. Mito Habe-Evans/NPR hide caption

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Mito Habe-Evans/NPR

Here's Why Obama Said The U.S. Is 'Less Racially Divided'

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Whiteness Project participants were filmed talking about race. The project doesn't use their names, to encourage frankness. Feral Films, Inc. hide caption

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Feral Films, Inc.

The Whiteness Project: Facing Race In A Changing America

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Even Under Obama, Black Activist Says Every Inch Of Progress Is A Fight

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