A court-approved protest staged by Zimbabwe's opposition supporters seeking electoral reforms turned violent Friday in Harare when it was broken up by police. Zinyange Auntony /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Evan Mawarire poses with a Zimbabwean flag in Harare, Zimbabwe, on May 3. He was arrested in July for inciting violence and disturbing the peace and left the country after he was released. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Outside Zimbabwe, Anti-Government Pastor Takes Stock Of His Movement

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Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe delivers the keynote address during Zimbabwe's 36th Independence Day celebrations in February in Harare. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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In this 2014 photo, prisoners are closely guarded at Chikurubi Maximum Prison in Harare, Zimbabwe. According to state media, at least 200 male inmates were freed from this prison as a result of President Robert Mugabe's pardons. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe eats his cake during Saturday's celebrations to mark his 92nd birthday. Mugabe appears to have no plans to step down as feuding over his successors threatens to tear Zimbabwe's ruling party apart. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Ann Cotton, pictured with students in Tanzania, makes sure girls have the funds for everything from books to shoes, so they won't "feel like a poor relation" in school. Courtesy of Camfed hide caption

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Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe went for matching accessories during a February celebration of his 91st birthday. He appears not to be a fan of goats. JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In a speech on Monday, Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe said his compatriots failed to protect Cecil the lion. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Zimbabwe's President Blames 'Vandals' For Killing Cecil The Lion

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