election election

The York Project, a series of stories that aired on NPR in 2008, about race and the election. David Deal/NPR hide caption

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David Deal/NPR

'York Project' Revisited: NPR Catches Up With Four 2008 Voters

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An election billboard promoting Gambian President Yahya Jammeh as part of his election campaign is removed by supporters of president-elect Adama Barrow on Saturday in Banjul, Gambia. Dawda Bayo/AP hide caption

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Dawda Bayo/AP

Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway sits with Robby Mook, Hillary Clinton's campaign manager, before a forum at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

There's a difference...

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After the election, professional peacemakers may feel they have to work harder to tamp down heightened feelings of "us versus them" in the workplace. Marcus Butt/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Butt/Ikon Images/Getty Images

It isn't just the people who went to Trump rallies who think he'll do a good job as president. Here, Trump turns to talk to members of the press at an event in Orlando in March. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Azra Baig won a second term on the school board in South Brunswick, N.J. But many of her reelection signs were defaced with anti-Muslim slurs. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

Following Hate Crimes And Trump's Election, Muslims Remain Resilient

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is defending the company against criticism that it doesn't vet fake news in its news feed. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Facebook, Google Take Steps To Confront Fake News

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A protester wearing a U.S. flag faces police during a protest Wednesday in Oakland, Calif. Thousands of protesters rallied across the United States expressing shock and anger over Donald Trump's election, vowing to oppose divisive views they say helped the Republican candidate win the presidency. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Jenn and Peter Stanley, on their visit with StoryCorps in Boston. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Just In Time For The Election, It's Time For Some Family Political Therapy

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A police officer keeps protesters at bay before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate at Dillard University in New Orleans Wednesday night. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Former KKK Leader David Duke Blames Debate Protests On Black Lives Matter 'Radicals'

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A letter from FBI Director James Comey (above) to Congress regarding emails that could be related to Hillary Clinton's private server has raised questions as to whether the timing and style of the announcement make it illegal. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Republican Stephanie Hill (left) and Democrat Rie Frisa of Nevada are neighbors with opposing political views who support each other's voting decision. David Greene/NPR hide caption

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David Greene/NPR

Nevada Neighbors Favor Different Presidential Candidates

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Election judges check ballots during a test of the ballot system at Denver election headquarters on Oct. 13. Edward Foley, an election law expert from Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law, says in the past, a "rigged" election has meant tampering with or stuffing ballot boxes or buying votes. He doesn't think that could happen on Nov. 8. Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images

Election Law Expert: Rigged Election 'Extraordinarily Unlikely'

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Ready to rock and roll, America? Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

LISTEN: Correspondent Don Gonyea's Campaign Homestretch Playlist

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