Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff speaks with the media in Atlanta on Apr. 18 as he runs against Republican Karen Handel to replace Tom Price, who is now the secretary of Health and Human Services. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Ad War Means Local TV Stations Win Big In Georgia's Special Election

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Gambian President Yahya Jammeh sits during his final pre-election rally in November in Banjul, Gambia. He lost that vote to rival Adama Barrow but has refused to step down. Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

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Jerome Delay/AP

The York Project, a series of stories that aired on NPR in 2008, about race and the election. David Deal/NPR hide caption

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David Deal/NPR

'York Project' Revisited: NPR Catches Up With Four 2008 Voters

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An election billboard promoting Gambian President Yahya Jammeh as part of his election campaign is removed by supporters of president-elect Adama Barrow on Saturday in Banjul, Gambia. Dawda Bayo/AP hide caption

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Dawda Bayo/AP

Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway sits with Robby Mook, Hillary Clinton's campaign manager, before a forum at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

There's a difference...

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After the election, professional peacemakers may feel they have to work harder to tamp down heightened feelings of "us versus them" in the workplace. Marcus Butt/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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It isn't just the people who went to Trump rallies who think he'll do a good job as president. Here, Trump turns to talk to members of the press at an event in Orlando in March. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Azra Baig won a second term on the school board in South Brunswick, N.J. But many of her reelection signs were defaced with anti-Muslim slurs. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

Following Hate Crimes And Trump's Election, Muslims Remain Resilient

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is defending the company against criticism that it doesn't vet fake news in its news feed. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Facebook, Google Take Steps To Confront Fake News

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A protester wearing a U.S. flag faces police during a protest Wednesday in Oakland, Calif. Thousands of protesters rallied across the United States expressing shock and anger over Donald Trump's election, vowing to oppose divisive views they say helped the Republican candidate win the presidency. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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