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Tennesee Nydegger-Sandidge (left) and Holly Hook try chowing down on some crickets. "People should eat them because they're good for the planet," says Tennessee. Melissa Banigan hide caption

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Melissa Banigan

For 13.1 million American kids, the lack of access to school meals during the summer means they're not sure when they might next eat. perepelova/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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perepelova/iStockphoto/Getty Images

After a young girl's lemonade stand in east London brought a fine of nearly $200, the local council apologized. Now the girl's family is calling on more kids to open their own stands. Matthew Mead/AP hide caption

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Matthew Mead/AP

Nicole Boykins is principal at Crocker College Prep in New Orleans. The pre-K through eighth grade school is one of five schools in a program to better serve children who've been exposed to trauma. Clarence Williams/WWNO hide caption

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Clarence Williams/WWNO

When Schools Meet Trauma With Understanding, Not Discipline

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Killip Elementary third graders Alexa Cardenas (left) and Luis Gonzalez (right) are preparing for the chess SuperNationals. Laurel Morales/Fronteras hide caption

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Laurel Morales/Fronteras

The Idea Was To Keep Kids Safe After School. Now They're Chess Champions

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Social media postings showing parents "disciplining" their children, including (from left) LaToya Graham, ReShonda Tate Billingsley and Tavis Sellers, went viral. ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR hide caption

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ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR

Shaw, 8, plays an improv game with Erin McTiernan, an Indiana State University doctoral student. Shaw is a participant in an improv class at Indiana State University for children with high functioning autism. Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Using Improv To Help Kids With Autism Show And Read Emotion

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Ruby Lortie (center, wearing black), marches to get out the vote with other fifth-grade students from Boulder Community School of Integrated Studies in Boulder, Colo. Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio

These Fifth-Graders Think It's Really, Really Important That You Vote

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The oversized book Under Water, Under Earth brings to vibrant life underwater and underground processes and activities. Candlewick Press hide caption

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Candlewick Press