Richie Blink, born and raised in Plaquemines Parish, La., south of New Orleans, works for the National Wildlife Federation. He got in touch with an archaeologist to take a look at some shards of pottery that were eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. Blink holds a pottery shard that could be 300 to 500 years old, from the Plaquemine culture of what's called the Bayou Petre phase. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

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Tegan Wendland/WWNO

Louisiana History Washes Away As Sea Levels Rise, Land Sinks

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Santo Tomas Catholic Church in Abiquiu, N.M., is the site of an annual saint's day celebration in late November that includes cultural elements of the genizaros, the descendants of Native American slaves. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Descendants Of Native American Slaves In New Mexico Emerge From Obscurity

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Navajo students at Crystal Boarding School in New Mexico sing traditional songs in class. Carrie Jung/KJZZ hide caption

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Carrie Jung/KJZZ

Native American Education: What Will It Take To Fix The 'Epitome Of Broken'?

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Tonya Stands recovers from being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters hoping to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, near Cannon Ball, N.D., on November 2. John L. Mone/AP hide caption

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John L. Mone/AP

Kids play ball on the Wind River Indian Reservation, which is home to members of the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone tribes. Angie Wagner/AP hide caption

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Angie Wagner/AP

With Little Housing Growth, Native American Families Live In Close Quarters

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People at the Oceti Sakowin Camp enjoy a meal inside a tent that serves as a dining hall. Oceti Sakowin is the largest of several camps housing demonstrators against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Courtesy of Brian Yazzie hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Yazzie

A road through the Gila River Indian Community in 2014. The tribe is one of 17 tribal governments the U.S. government announced Monday it had settled lawsuits with, over alleged mismanagement of land and resources. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Bureau of Land Management Ranger Shane Nalen stands on public land that he patrols outside of Las Vegas, Nev. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Federal Officers Face Hostility Amid Tension Over Control Of Federal Lands

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Native American protestors gather at a construction site for the Dakota Access pipeline to perform a daily prayer ceremony. Over 1,000 people, most Native American, have gathered at two prayer camps along the Cannonball River near its confluence with the Missouri in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access pipeline. Andrew Cullen hide caption

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Andrew Cullen

Chris Green, a tribal member, and his son get the dogs out early to round up a herd at Big Cypress Reservation. Carlton Ward Jr/National Geographic Creative hide caption

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Carlton Ward Jr/National Geographic Creative

South Florida's Seminole Cowboys: Cattle Is 'In Our DNA'

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Michael Peterson, an archaeologist at Redwood National Park in California, photographs the coastline annually to monitor erosion of archaeological sites. Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix hide caption

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Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix

As Storms Erode California's Cliffs, Buried Village Could Get Washed Away

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A reconstruction of Kennewick Man sculpted to resemble the Ainu people of Japan, considered by some at the time to be his closest living relatives. Now, a link to Native Americans has been confirmed. Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institute hide caption

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Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institute

Crow tribal historian Joe Medicine Crow speaks of unity in 2001 at a dedication of a "Peace Memorial," near the site of the Battle of Little Bighorn. Beck Bohrer /AP hide caption

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Beck Bohrer /AP