Bureau of Land Management Ranger Shane Nalen stands on public land that he patrols outside of Las Vegas, Nev. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Federal Officers Face Hostility Amid Tension Over Control Of Federal Lands

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Native American protestors gather at a construction site for the Dakota Access pipeline to perform a daily prayer ceremony. Over 1,000 people, most Native American, have gathered at two prayer camps along the Cannonball River near its confluence with the Missouri in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access pipeline. Andrew Cullen hide caption

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Chris Green, a tribal member, and his son get the dogs out early to round up a herd at Big Cypress Reservation. Carlton Ward Jr/National Geographic Creative hide caption

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South Florida's Seminole Cowboys: Cattle Is 'In Our DNA'

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Michael Peterson, an archaeologist at Redwood National Park in California, photographs the coastline annually to monitor erosion of archaeological sites. Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix hide caption

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As Storms Erode California's Cliffs, Buried Village Could Get Washed Away

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A reconstruction of Kennewick Man sculpted to resemble the Ainu people of Japan, considered by some at the time to be his closest living relatives. Now, a link to Native Americans has been confirmed. Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institute hide caption

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Crow tribal historian Joe Medicine Crow speaks of unity in 2001 at a dedication of a "Peace Memorial," near the site of the Battle of Little Bighorn. Beck Bohrer /AP hide caption

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Solenex's proposed well site is on the land known as the Badger-Two Medicine. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Tribe Says Drilling Project Would Have 'Heartbreaking' Consequences

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Delma and Antonio Salazar have been caring for Delma's mother, Agnes Williams (middle), who has severe memory problems, for the past seven years. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Alzheimer's Disease Underdiagnosed In Indian Country

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Princess Pageant crowns reflect the importance of patchwork, beadwork, and Seminole symbols. Will O'Leary hide caption

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A Princess In Patchwork: Sewing For The Miss Florida Seminole Princess Pageant

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The Yocha Dehe tribe grows, mills and markets its own extra-virgin olive oil. The tribe's mill uses top-of-the-line equipment imported from Florence, Italy. Courtesy of Lisa Morehouse hide caption

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Native American Tribe Bets On Olive Oil

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"Osceola" stands in front of a crowd at the FSU homecoming game. Eileen Soler/Seminole Tribune hide caption

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Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

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Adidas has pledged to help high school teams that want to change their mascots from Native American imagery. President Obama praised the effort, while the Washington football team shot back, calling the company's move hypocritical. Christof Stache/AP hide caption

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