Native American Native American

Wes Moore speaks at the Robin Hood Veterans Summit at Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum on May 7, 2012 in New York City. Craig Barritt/Getty Images hide caption

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Craig Barritt/Getty Images

At Saint Michael's Association for Special Education in St. Michaels, Ariz., the tap water sometimes runs yellow, brown and black. Sami Rapp/Courtesy of Saint Michael's Association for Special Education hide caption

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Sami Rapp/Courtesy of Saint Michael's Association for Special Education

On The Navajo Nation, Special Ed Students Await Water That Doesn't Stink

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Black-and-white keffiyeh like the one pictured above have long been associated with Yasser Arafat and the Palestinian resistance. This week, fast-fashion Brit emporium Top Shop used similar fabric for a "scarf playsuit." Hazem Bader/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hazem Bader/AFP/Getty Images

The Arrowhead Inn is one of four Whiteclay, Neb., stores that sell 4 million cans of beer annually. The stores are currently up for sale. Jim Kent for NPR hide caption

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Jim Kent for NPR

Pastor Raises Money To Buy Out Liquor Stores Near Reservation

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Vintage Seminole patchwork on display at the home of Patsy West, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Courtesy of Will O'Leary hide caption

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Courtesy of Will O'Leary

Seminole Patchwork: Admiration And Appropriation

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Mary Lynne Bill-Old Coyote, Montana's director of Indian health, says the ACA has helped build the community by providing job opportunities. Montana saw 3 percent growth last year in the number of health care jobs. Courtesy of Thom Bridge/Helena Independent Record hide caption

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Courtesy of Thom Bridge/Helena Independent Record

Obamacare Brought Jobs To Indian Country That Could Vanish With Repeal

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Richie Blink, born and raised in Plaquemines Parish, La., south of New Orleans, works for the National Wildlife Federation. He got in touch with an archaeologist to take a look at some shards of pottery that were eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. Blink holds a pottery shard that could be 300 to 500 years old, from the Plaquemine culture of what's called the Bayou Petre phase. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

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Tegan Wendland/WWNO

Louisiana History Washes Away As Sea Levels Rise, Land Sinks

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Santo Tomas Catholic Church in Abiquiu, N.M., is the site of an annual saint's day celebration in late November that includes cultural elements of the genizaros, the descendants of Native American slaves. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Descendants Of Native American Slaves In New Mexico Emerge From Obscurity

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Navajo students at Crystal Boarding School in New Mexico sing traditional songs in class. Carrie Jung/KJZZ hide caption

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Carrie Jung/KJZZ

Native American Education: What Will It Take To Fix The 'Epitome Of Broken'?

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Tonya Stands recovers from being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters hoping to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, near Cannon Ball, N.D., on November 2. John L. Mone/AP hide caption

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John L. Mone/AP

Kids play ball on the Wind River Indian Reservation, which is home to members of the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone tribes. Angie Wagner/AP hide caption

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Angie Wagner/AP

With Little Housing Growth, Native American Families Live In Close Quarters

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People at the Oceti Sakowin Camp enjoy a meal inside a tent that serves as a dining hall. Oceti Sakowin is the largest of several camps housing demonstrators against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Courtesy of Brian Yazzie hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Yazzie

A road through the Gila River Indian Community in 2014. The tribe is one of 17 tribal governments the U.S. government announced Monday it had settled lawsuits with, over alleged mismanagement of land and resources. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images