Emily Meggett (left) and Isabell Meggett Lucas sit together at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in front of a slave cabin on display that they grew up in. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Woman Returns To Her Slave Cabin Childhood Home In The Smithsonian

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Michelle Taylor and other participants work to reconstruct slave cabins at Montpelier, the Virginia estate of former President James Madison. Courtesy of Michelle Taylor hide caption

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Courtesy of Michelle Taylor

A Researcher Reconnects With Her Ancestors' Slave Past At Madison's Estate

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Jane Givens searches for her father, Phil, and sister, Biddy, through an ad placed in Cincinnati's The Colored Citizen in 1866. Courtesy of Last Seen hide caption

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Courtesy of Last Seen

After Slavery, Searching For Loved Ones In Wanted Ads

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A $35 million project is underway at Monticello to re-create or restore spaces where Thomas Jefferson's slaves worked and lived. ©Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello hide caption

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©Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello

Monticello Restoration Project Puts An Increased Focus On Jefferson's Slaves

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President Barack Obama speaks during the dedication ceremony for the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC, on Sept. 24, 2016. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

The Alma Mater statue on the Columbia University campus in New York City. The university has released an initial report on its historical ties to slavery in America. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Santo Tomas Catholic Church in Abiquiu, N.M., is the site of an annual saint's day celebration in late November that includes cultural elements of the genizaros, the descendants of Native American slaves. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Descendants Of Native American Slaves In New Mexico Emerge From Obscurity

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Looking out at the Atlantic Ocean from Elmina Castle, I felt the pull of different forebears. Courtesy of Kainaz Amaria hide caption

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Courtesy of Kainaz Amaria

Finding A Way Home Through 'The Door Of No Return'

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A new exhibit at George Washington's Mount Vernon plantation house explores the complexity of the first president's relationship with the slaves he owned that lived and worked there. Tom is the first of the 19 slaves profiled throughout the exhibit, which opened on Oct. 1. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Patricia Bayonne-Johnson holds a photo of her great-grandparents and their son. The retired science teacher discovered that some of her ancestors were sold by the Jesuits of the Maryland Province in 1838, to pay off Georgetown University's massive debt. Nick Otto/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Otto/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Harriet Tubman, pictured between 1860 and 1875. The woman who will soon become the first African-American to grace an American currency note self-funded many of her heroic raids to save slaves by cooking. H.B. Lindsley/Library of Congress via AP hide caption

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H.B. Lindsley/Library of Congress via AP

A group of students calling themselves Reclaim Harvard Law School has been occupying a student center for weeks, demanding greater attention to racial issues, including more diversity among the faculty. Chiquita Paschal/Chiquita Paschal hide caption

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Chiquita Paschal/Chiquita Paschal

History Of Slavery, Future Of Diversity Still At Issue At Harvard

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Oxford University Press

When Ancestry Search Led To Escaped Slave: 'All I Could Do Was Weep'

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