Adebisi Alimi, an actor-turned-activist, was the first person ever to come out as gay on Nigerian television. He now shares his story when he speaks up for the rights of the LGBT community. Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Claire Eggers/NPR

Doug Neville (left) and Ryan Johnson have been friends for three decades. They met shortly before Neville found out he was HIV-positive. StoryCorps hide caption

itoggle caption StoryCorps

Ruth Coker Burks with her friend Paul Wineland. Wineland's partner was one of many AIDS patients Coker Burks has cared for over the past three decades. StoryCorps hide caption

itoggle caption StoryCorps
Lee Woodgate/Ikon Images/Corbis

Several countries, including Australia, Japan and Great Britain, already encourage blood donations from some gay men. Kevin Curtis/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

itoggle caption Kevin Curtis/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Sizwe Nzima, right, and one of his six employees deliver medicines to patients in a Cape Town neighborhood. Anders Kelto for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Anders Kelto for NPR

South Africa Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi has no patience for people who abuse their health and expect the government to fix things. Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images

Do you know what the deadliest disease is? Hint: It's not Ebola (viral particles seen here in a digitally colorized microscopic image, at top right, along with similar depictions of other contagious diseases) NPR Composite/CDC hide caption

itoggle caption NPR Composite/CDC

Peter Piot was one of the co-discoverers of the Ebola virus in 1976. "I never thought we would see such a devastating and vast epidemic," he says. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Over a decade ago, rumors spread in South Africa that sex with a virgin could cure HIV/AIDS. In 2001, 150 people gathered in Cape Town to protest the rape of children and even babies, allegedly as a result of belief in this canard. Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images

Better than Egyptian cotton: This electrically spun fabric contains anti-HIV drugs and dissolves rapidly when it gets wet. Courtesy of University of Washington hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of University of Washington

Truvada, an FDA-approved drug to help prevent HIV infection, is among the AIDS drugs that fill pharmacy shelves at the Whitman-Walker clinic, a Washington, D.C., community health center. Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov

Joep Lange led many early drug trials of HIV therapies and studied how to prevent HIV-positive pregnant women from transmitting the virus to their babies. Jean Ayissi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jean Ayissi/AFP/Getty Images

AIDS drugs line a pharmacy's shelves. A new recommendation from the World Health Organization suggests a daily anti-HIV pill for men who have sex with men. Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov

Human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 inserts its genetic material into the DNA of human cells, turning them into little HIV factories. Eye of Science/Science Source hide caption

itoggle caption Eye of Science/Science Source