Every day, hundreds of patients wait to be seen at the Munhava health center in Mozambique's port city of Beira. Morgana Wingard hide caption

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The Sole Doctor In The Hospital Shoulders The Burden Of HIV

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Catherine Msimango, 18, takes a nightly pill to protect her against HIV. "It's all about my safety," says the South African high schooler. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Why Healthy Teens Are Taking A Daily Anti-AIDS Pill

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The alleyway known as the Beira "corridor" is part of the city's informal prostitution zone, where sex workers wait to meet clients. Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fighting HIV In Two High-Risk Groups: Sex Workers And Truck Drivers

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Cleopas Kapembwa Chisanga of Zambia, who is HIV positive, is the subject of a new video and will be broadcasting from this week's International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa. Sydelle Willow Smith/International Aids Society hide caption

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A billboard asks Ugandans to abstain from sex until marriage. The photo was taken in 2005 in Kampala. Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Spent $1.4 Billion To Stop HIV By Promoting Abstinence. Did It Work?

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African-American men who have sex with men face a high risk of becoming infected with HIV. Jose Luis Pelaez Inc/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gay and bisexual men were banned from donating blood over concern that HIV could contaminate the blood supply. Vesna Andjic/Getty Images hide caption

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FDA Lifts Ban On Blood Donations By Gay And Bisexual Men

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Eduardo Gonzalez is HIV positive. His mother died of AIDS; his father, who's HIV positive, is in jail. The boy lives at Eunime, a Tijuana facility for children whose parents have faced AIDS in their family and who may themselves be infected. Courtesy of Malcolm Linton hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Malcolm Linton